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Discussion Starter #1
Would you consider a full sized hiking backpack a bug out bag? Or would another term be more appropriate?
 

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Sure, why not. Particularly if one is bugging out on foot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the responses. Was thinking maybe something that big would make me a target, But if things are that bad I'm not gonna be outside anyways.
 

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I think if the situation gets bad enough to were people are bugging out, then any pack will make you a target. It's much better to have a hiking pack than some specially designed or .mil type pack IMHO.
 

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I have an Osprey Motherload Ballistic as my bug-out bag. I use my Dana Terraplane for my regular hiking. If you are bugging out, you might as well have a comfortable pack.

For me, I will most probably bug-in. But you never know.
 

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It's always got on my nerves how people talk about "bugging out" like it's a strategy of some sort.
"Bugging out" is specifically what you do when all your plans have gone to shit and it's time to leave, or else.

That being said, if you find yourself in such a situation, you're probably already being pursued by someone, even if they're not yet close enough to actually see you yet.
Better just use whatever is tough and will carry your minimum load. Focus on getting your gear selection to a minimum and spend the money on quality over quantity I think.

Doesn't matter what kind of pack you have on your back. Hell, it doesn't even matter if you have a pack or just a jacket with some pockets; if you're out on your own, you will be a potential target for anyone with a predatory mindset.
 

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It's always got on my nerves how people talk about "bugging out" like it's a strategy of some sort.
"Bugging out" is specifically what you do when all your plans have gone to shit and it's time to leave, or else.

That being said, if you find yourself in such a situation, you're probably already being pursued by someone, even if they're not yet close enough to actually see you yet.
Better just use whatever is tough and will carry your minimum load. Focus on getting your gear selection to a minimum and spend the money on quality over quantity I think.

Doesn't matter what kind of pack you have on your back. Hell, it doesn't even matter if you have a pack or just a jacket with some pockets; if you're out on your own, you will be a potential target for anyone with a predatory mindset.
Total agreement with your perspective on bugging out...This is the way of the refugee. Having known refugees and heard the stories of my parents surviving the Japanese occupation of the Philippines during the war, bugging out is not a really appealling proposition.
 

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As has been said, anything your carrying could potentially make you a target. Whatever pack you decide to use, don't get one that's too large to carry for hours on end. People have a tendency to try and fill pack to capacity, so think carefully about what you pack, and then what it weighs.
 

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Now I remember my days of humpin a ruck,those old ones were quite uncomfortable to say the least.Plus we always had them loaded to the gills,and that didn't help.
A lesson I learned from those days was how to pack a ruck and with what necessity's to bring.

If you have to di di mau with your stuff on your back spend the money and get something that would be comfortable and sturdy.
With all the new stuff out there it's a hard choice to make.Ask any of your buddies and see who has what and try them out before shelling out some good money on something that you wont like.
 

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I'll admit to owning more packs than I will ever need, but I'm glad to have them each for a purpose. I have an old huge Lowe pack from the mid-1980's that has proven to be comfortable and rugged, but the side panels being bright pink (damn 80's trends, it being mostly black & green was the most 'muted' I could find back then...) pretty much eliminate its utility as a b.o.b. It's also larger than what I think a true 'bug-out bag should be: I imagine that if I am 'buggin'-out,' then I am 'on the run,' and need to travel lighter than this bag allows. These days, this old pack gets used to haul heavy stuff: most recently a sledge-hammer, post hole digger, shovel, and survey stakes up a remote hill for a perk test at a possible future building site. I've also used it on rock-hounding trips to haul hammers, chisels, and minerals long distances. Great pack.

Another great, older pack has been a Gregory from the 1990's. It's tough & huge & comfortable, but it's a panel-loader. Even though the zippers Gregory used back then are quality, and even though it also has straps and beefy clips to further secure the load, I couldn't really trust it as a b.o.b. It's also still larger than what I think should be considered when 'buggin'-out.' At least it's dark green though, for a bit better camouflage. I don't backpack much anymore, but this is what I would use my next long trip, whenever that may be.

For a smaller, overnight pack, I have a newer Gregory. They still make a quality product, but have gotten into gram-shaving, perhaps at the expense of durability. I am always afraid that some impact will smash the smaller clips or tear the newer, lighter-weight fabric on this pack. But so far it has held up ok in limited outings. It's bright blue though, so another strike against being a true b.o.b.

I recently bought the "British Military Tactical Radio Rucksack" from Sportsmen's Guide as another large day pack or small overnight bag. It relies on heavy-duty zippers/straps/clips kind of like my old Gregory, but seems like it should hold up ok. For under sixty bucks, it's a good deal: heavy fabric, good, comfortable suspension system, etc. Like posters above, I hope never to need a b.o.b., and hope to be able to 'bug-in' through any future crisis. But I may toss this British pack into my car for the winter with a few supplies to be my 'get-home-bag' in case of emergencies. If you're on a budget, this pack could be worth a look: it's item #WX2-236248 on their website. Comparable packs at outdoor stores would all be $100+. If there is ever any need to bug-out and get on the run, then this pack is also about the right size for quick movements, keeping a rifle slung, and yet still carrying a useful amount of gear.

In general, I'd echo the recommendations of the smart comments above. Find a pack that's big enough for the essentials, but not too big. Make sure that the fit and suspension are comfortable, especially when loaded-down to capacity. Pay particular attention to the waist belt and sternum strap (my wife has trouble with some packs' sternum strap location and design due to the particulars of female anatomy...). Newer packs will generally have better ventilation along the back (good to reduce sweating/chilling when hiking stop & go). Multiple external pockets can be nice, but well-organized ditty bags inside the one main pocket of a pack can achieve the same level of convenience and organization with a cleaner, more snag-free exterior. Beware of zippers in critical locations that could fail at crucial moments.

-otus
 

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You might have to most unassuming, invisable bag only to get shot for your sneakers. Sometimes its possible to over think a situation
 

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I have a small pack, and I try to stay light. If I am running, it's because staying in-place equals certain death. As others have stated above, refugees die on the run.

Basically, only a Fukushima-type crisis nearby will make me run. I'm too old to run far, or for very long...
 

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As has been said, anything your carrying could potentially make you a target. Whatever pack you decide to use, don't get one that's too large to carry for hours on end. People have a tendency to try and fill pack to capacity, so think carefully about what you pack, and then what it weighs.
Absolutely. You will try to bring your entire house with you if you buy a giant pack. Don't envision a week long hiking trip at a national park,with all of the comforts you would want. What do you NEED to survive if everything goes to shit? It is a much smaller list than you think.
 

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Why did you choose a PSL for a on the go weapon if you don't mind me asking? I think the weight of that and the ammo, not to mention how much can be carried over distances would be a bit to much. Once I put my Krink together and realized how much lighter it was I knew what I was going to carry with me.
 

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I think everyone just needs to consider their own needs and choose the options that fit them. Some will travel light, others travel heavy and other will not travel at all. ;)

Id think the more Urban the "outting" the lighter, smaller you'd want to be. My situation would be bugging out into open hills. More of a camping setup. Whereas where I used to live would be more of an Escape From New York setup.
 
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