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Caught a ride in one at the Dayton Air Show about eight or nine years ago. Vietnam veteran bird, about the same age as myself. As a bonus, I got to sit in the door gunner seat, right behind an M60. "Flight of the Valkeries" kept racing through my head. Good times.
 

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Used to ride on 'em all the time out of Tipton Army Airfield in Maryland, loved having the doors pinned open and doing low levels down the Potomac. Wagner was playing in my mind as well.

But I gotta say the Blackhawks are a much nicer ride. Had them hauling us all around Bosnia and it was like a Cadillac compared to a Chevrolet. A fair amount faster as well.

I still hear/see a Huey on occasion, and it brings back great memories. Much like the C-130, they are classic aircraft that far exceeded their expectations...
 

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Air Force pilots fly UH-1Ns over the service’s bases in Wyoming, North Dakota and Montana to monitor ICBM sites. The service also maintains Huey fleets at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., to airlift VIPs around Washington; and at Hurlburt Field, Fla., for special operations missions.The Marines are working out a strategy to transfer as many as 26 UH-1N helicopters to the Air Force, which may add them to their active fleet or keep them in reserve.



The USAF is toying with the idea of buying USMC UH-1Y "Venom" models like the one pictured above.
I hope they do as they will need to provide ICBM site support and Andrews VIP missions for the foreseeable future.


Plus it's like a Huey pumped up on steroids..
 

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Seems like when I was stationed at NAS Brunswick and NAS Fallon they used H-1's as SAR helo's. I used to maintain the (electrical) batteries for them in Fallon, probably the biggest aircraft battery I ever saw (wanna say 60 AH or so).
 

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While the Chinook is my favorite, I do love the Huey as well! Blackhawks, on the other hand...I despise them! Lol
 

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Love the UH-1 miss its distinct noise, loved to jump them back in the day a lot more fun to jump than a "crash"hawk.
 

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I loved riding in them, especially the hell hole.
 

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from the title,i thought this thread was about some song from huey lewis and the news.

yeah,true classic chopper. there's probably always one flying somewhere in the world 24/7 365. classic sound too,very distinct,..(like the AK 7.62)
 

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Ch-53 for me. Never ridden a huey.
 

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My wife's brother flew dustoff missions in Desert Storm and later some DEA/US Army stuff in central and south America.(He speaks Spanish fluently) He still refuses to speak about the drug interdiction stuff and I don't press him on it but I have a feeling they operated on the edge of US and probably international laws concerning such things.



Found one of his pictures when he was in Honduras.
 

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Did my share of Eagle Flights on Huey's in Vietnam. Nice view but a hot LZ drop or booby trapped area was not fun to be dropped into. The Dust Off was a good thing., and saved many lives.

Always liked the S64 Sikorsky Sky Crane. Never flew in one though>



A C-47 Chinook is like a flying transit bus. Slow and clumsy and a big target, But can haul a lot of stuff.
 

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The Blackhawk was brand new when I was in. Did more than a couple of chopper blasts from UH-1'S, STABO and rappelling too. We used Huey's in Europe mostly until my last 10 months or so. My first duty station was Ft. Lewis WA, used to listen to them taking off and landing on Grey Army Airfeild day and night. Nothing sounds like one on a cool wet morning at sun up.
 

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Rode in a Huey for the first time when I was about 8 at an airshow. Saw the Thunderbirds flying T-38's the same day. Always loved the Huey, namely from the hellacious noise it made. Could ID them miles away as a kid just by the noise
 

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I flew Hueys for 7 years in the Army.

It was a great flying aircraft. Honest, predictable, and gave you chances to unfuck yourself that many aircraft wouldn't. The biggest limitations were no power and no tail rotor authority. Often if the wind was too high, there was no way to hover on certain headings because the T/R just didn't have enough trust to keep you pointed in the right direction. There were all sorts of tricks to work around it's limitations though. It was just a matter of experience.

The CH-47 was actually a medium lift helicopter in the begining, and the -54 Skycrane was the heavy lift asset. Once you got to the C and C+, you had a much better perfroming aircraft. The D model was the watershed that changed it to a heavy lift aircraft. It's big, but it's actually the fasted helicopter the Army has, and one of the faster ones anyone has. The blades are friggin huge, and because of the large surface area on them, the Chinook is actually a highly maneuverable aircraft. The Huey was light, and you could throw it around, but the Chinook can actually maneuver harder. Once you get a sling load on any helicopter though, it's a different story. Sling loads are a pendulum hanging from a pendulum. The D's and later with multi-hooks (along with the later -53's) are much more stable. Single hook systems get more oscillation. As a side note, the OH-6 had the combination of being light enough and powerful enough that it could sling out another OH-6. You generally don't get that capability.

We still had Skycranes when I started flying in the Army. It was neat because it had a winch, so there was alot of niche things it could do. The niche market wasn't enough to save it though. Once the CH-47D came out, it could sling anything the Army would need slung, and anything else was too heavy for anything anyway.

In the Huey, we'd sling some pretty minor loads once in a while, but we tended to internal load as much as possible because it was just better for us. You could load the old Mechanical Mule inside one by putting plywood on the floor and leaving the doors open so the Mule stuck out both sides. It let you go faster, lower, and safer, though it took a little more time loading and unloading than slinging a Mule. The Mule was light enough to sling at least. We could lift a jeep if we didn't have much fuel, but it wasn't practical because the fuel load had to be extremely light. Our hook was rated at 4000 lbs, but the Aircraft weighed 7600 or so with just a flight crew and full bag of gas, and the max GW was 9500 (later 10500 for combat during the Gulf War) so you can see you weren't going to max out the hook in the Huey wthout trying hard. The UH-1H's engine (L-13B) didn't have a great power curve, so once it started getting hot or high, you weren't going to get close to 9500lbs before you ran out of power anyway.

The Cobra had the same engine early on, but once it got the TOW it became heavy as crap and they put in an improved version (L-703). It had the same power, but a better power curve, and a better transmission, etc, so more of it was usable. In the Huey, we had to actually detune the engine so it wouldn't blow out the XMSN.

A few years back the USAF received a bunch of Hueys from the Army and did the upgrade Bell was offering with the 214 parts and the Cobra engine (TH-1H) and they use them for training aircraft. It's a pretty slick version, and a cheap solution. The USAF used to send their helo guys to our flight school at Rucker to be trained by the Army. So we had USAF guys in our class, along with foregin students, like the Germans, Saudis, etc. When they graduated, they would go to a USAF training base in the Southwest, and transition to whatever they would fly in their line units. When the Army bailed on the Huey, it left the USAF to fend for itself for primary training, so they got that bunch of the old Rucker birds and refurbed them and run their own initial training now.

I've actually flown the Huey that sits in the Udvar-Hazy Smithsonian Museum. Yeah, seeing it in there made me feel old.
 

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I think the Navy keeps some of the latest versions, I have no clue what they use them for but more than likely its some sort of research/test/development. As far as I know they are not used for primary operations, thats what the H60 series is used for.

I have never flown on a helo, I would like to try it out once, but I see my self getting air sick on one lol. I used to watch them do vert reps at sea and was always impressed at how skilled they could handle those birds.
 

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Only one Huey fan on the whole site?
The rotor-sound stays with people for decades. When they're tilted-sideways, it's easy to fall-out or to toss/roll gernades out the door. The pilots seemed never to pass-up any opportunity for a flight....whiskey & women on Uncle Sams gas!...:cool:
 
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