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So which would be considered a more practical tool, a machete or a kukri? And what do you base this on? I"'ve been thinking of picking either one up, but not sure of the pros or cons of either. Intended use would be as a tool for chopping wood. Any other recommendations?
 

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Kukri will be better for chopping wood. Most machetes are too long and lack the heft the kukri has for up-close work. Neither are as effective as a hatchet for the task... especially for splitting.

The kukri comes the closest to being a balanced compromise between a knife, machete, and hatchet in a camp tool. If I could carry only one bladed tool, it'd be a kukri. But I'd prefer a hatchet and a knife otherwise.
 

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I have never used a Kukri, but have used a machete. They can make short work of removing brush etc. It would really depending on what you are planning on using it for and where you are using it. I think a Kukri would work in thick brush/jungle like setting but I think a machete would be a better tool for the job.

Like it was pointed out above the Kukri would be a better all around camp tool for light chopping, knife work etc. I dont think I would be taking a machete with me on a camping trip, due to its size etc its kinda impractical for that unless you had to remove alot of brush for your camp site. *** The thing with machete's is the blade is thin and it flexes, dont get me wrong you can chop some decent size brush with a machete but anything bigger than your forearm not so much. It would make a horrible dedicated wood chopping tool though.

I use a small Wetterlings hatchet, its sharp enough to shave with and makes quick work for light/medium chopping jobs. It sucks for splitting due to the shortness of the handle unless you use a baton. I think a midsize axe would be perfect all around tool.
 

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rob-cubed said:
Kukri will be better for chopping wood. Most machetes are too long and lack the heft the kukri has for up-close work. Neither are as effective as a hatchet for the task... especially for splitting.

The kukri comes the closest to being a balanced compromise between a knife, machete, and hatchet in a camp tool. If I could carry only one bladed tool, it'd be a kukri. But I'd prefer a hatchet and a knife otherwise.
+1 I have used machete's a lot, and IMO, a kukri is a better choice.
 

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A Kukri is a very useful knife I have a couple of them. However lately I ordered a Malaysian Village Parang from Condor Tool and Knife and have been working with it. It's also useful. I first read about the Parang in the SAS Survival guide years ago but only lately found one I liked.
 

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Frankly, assuming you want something to use and not hang on a wall, Cold Steel prices mean that you can buy both! I own a pair of their Heavy Machetes and really like them. No reason not to spend the extra $30 to own an appropriate variety of tools.
 

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eightbore said:
Frankly, assuming you want something to use and not hang on a wall, Cold Steel prices mean that you can buy both! I own a pair of their Heavy Machetes and really like them. No reason not to spend the extra $30 to own an appropriate variety of tools.[/quote

Are the cold steel items quality or junk?
 

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Eric Cartman Sr said:
eightbore said:
Frankly, assuming you want something to use and not hang on a wall, Cold Steel prices mean that you can buy both! I own a pair of their Heavy Machetes and really like them. No reason not to spend the extra $30 to own an appropriate variety of tools.[/quote

Are the cold steel items quality or junk?
My preference is a kukri. The curve of the blade causes a slicing motion with just a downward force.

Cold Steel quality is good to excellent, but they do have varied grades of steel. The quality depends on the item and its materials.

I have a Cold Steel LTC (Kukri) in Carbon V steel with a Kraton handle. It is outstanding. The Carbon V alloy is no longer made - the supply is now fixed - so prices on Carbon V models have hit "preban" levels. I think the last Carbon V LTC I watched on ePay went for about $150. I don't ever plan to sell mine. I paid $50 shipped for mine in 1995 or so.


The newer 97KMS Cold Steel Kukris use a cheaper steel but is shaped in the same pattern as my LTC. I have no experience with that model but it is so inexpensive I have considered getting one to abuse. I've got a local hardware store that carries them.

97KMS $25 shipped.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cold-Steel-Kukr ... 20d39b1aaa

Like having a a few extra $250 9mm handguns for SHTF, it might be a good idea to have a few extra 97KMS kukris around.
 

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Just a thought....

After trying numerous 'choppers' over the years, and never being really happy with any of them, I settled on the Ontario SP8 which is modeled after the centuries old Japanese Nata. I found it to be a far more practical length (15" OAL) & weight (1.5lbs) than any of the long, thin, light machete variations, of which all seem to be 'grass cutter' blades sheepishly pressed into chopping duty. While the SP8 actually chops, splits, and cuts like a tool designed for its purpose, which is why the Japanese still use them to this day. Added bonuses are a well thought out & solid sheath, a price of $50, and its made in the U.S.

 
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