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Discussion Starter #1
Which is cleaner/better? The 80's Bulgy surplus or the 70's Russian stuff? I drift towards the Bulgy because it's 10 years newer. I know they're both corrosive, is one alot "dirtier" than the other???

Thanks
 

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I believe the Russian is cleaner than the Bulgarian, slightly less corrosive, at least those are the reports I've read. Age really doesnt matter; thats the plus side of corrosive primers, they will last practically forever.
 

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Hey BigAl..

How's your bolts holding up to the corrosive ammo? You getting in rings of corrision forming on your bolts around the firing pin?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've not been shooting the corrosive stuff. I've been hording it. I have some of each and was going to buy some more, i just wondered which way would be best to go..
 

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The Bulgarian stuff is definitely A LOT hotter than the Russian stuff.

If you have a Krinkov, take off the flashider and fire a mag of Russian ammo, then fire a mag of Bulgarian ammo. You will hear, feel, and see the difference :animak:
 

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Better Mil-Surp

Hi Folks....

Just my two cents worth:
You will probably note improved accuracy with the '76 Soviet, Tula-manufactured stuff.

The Bulgarian is OK, but as far as 7N6, you will see the best groups are always a bit larger with it than with "old" Soviet ammo.

I have shot both extensively through a few '74 models and an SSG-82 DDR bolt gun.

As far as hotter ammo, both are the same velocity in a standard barrel.

My guess is that the increased flash and blast of Bulgarian fodder would be due to a somewhat slower powder burn rate, or a less effective flash-suppressant formula. I too have noticed this effect, but the chronograph says the velocity is within normal batch-to-batch variance. No clear winner in the velocity department.

~FFF
 

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what kind of groups are you getting with Soviet 7n6 from the SSG-82?
 

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Better 7N6

Hi PM...

In an SSG-82, groups with Soviet 7N6 have been hovering around 1 3/4".
Pretty good for military ball. Bulgarian has been anything over 2 1/2"

The commercial Barnaul lead-core that was available a few years ago is notably better, with 1 3/8" being typical in that gun. Also, it is non-corrosive, the unlined East German barrel has seen more of that ammo.

Dynamit Nobel (RWS) that came with these guns is sometimes a sub-minute (1") performer, but not reliably.

The gun is action-bedded in glass, and the barrel unsupported. Standard 4x glass, six shot groups at 100 yards from a shooting-bagged rest.

Oddly, the mil-spec Bulgarian '74 builds often seem capable of an honest two-inch group with Soviet 7N6 ammo when shot off of a rest. Izhevsk Design Bureau did their homework well. Bulgarian 7N6 shoots a three to four inch rested group.

Has anyone here tested Soviet 7N10 enough to see how it groups by comparison?

-FFF
 

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Five four five thank you so much for your super informative post! I'm also ready to buy a tin and your testing really helped me out!!

-545p
 

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They are all about the same, Bulgarian is my choice because its the newest - early 90s versus 70s.
 

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so far the best in terms of QC overall has been the Ukranian stuff, with the Kazak, then Vympel/siberian, Novisibersk, Barnual, Tula, Ulyanovsk. best to worst in that order for the Soviet surplus.
 

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so how do I tell which is which again? marking on the tin, and / or crate?

edit: I did find this - Headstamp Codes to identify makers - will this link help to read the markings on the 5.45 tin / crate?

LeibstandarteAdH said:
so far the best in terms of QC overall has been the Ukranian stuff, with the Kazak, then Vympel/siberian, Novisibersk, Barnual, Tula, Ulyanovsk. best to worst in that order for the Soviet surplus.
 

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that website has them all, then just find the headstamp on the tin and match it up is the easyest way to describe it. there is a post somwhere on here with the tin marking brakedown

it has year, factory, powder and primer lots, caliber, designation (core material ect..) all on the tin
 

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i bought a little of the bulgarian and a little of the russian last year to try both and see what i liked. the russian is cleaner and in my opinion does not stink as bad. they both shot pretty close out of a romanian '74. needless to say i made a large purchase of russian. i got it at around 10.5 cents a round. it is very accurate and consistant ammo. especially for the price. you can't even reload used brass for that price.

i have recently made a large purchase of hotshot 68gr 5.45. mostly to plink with out of my M&P 15R. it is not very accurate but when you buy $500 the shipping is free and it made it around 12.5 cents. for non-corrosive it's a steal. i tested it in a tantal, a sar2, and century tantal. it worked fine in all but the century build with the fubared barrel.
 

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That's what I'm looking for. Had a picture of a tin and / or crate with arrows pointing to what's what.

LeibstandarteAdH said:
...there is a post somwhere on here with the tin marking brakedown

it has year, factory, powder and primer lots, caliber, designation (core material ect..) all on the tin
 

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Here's a pic of the Bulgarian case, I'll try to get a pic of the Russian tomorrow.

 
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