AK Rifles banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 90 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Century has a bunch of used WASR-10/63 rifles that were used Ugandan mercenaries employed in various security positions by U.S. based private military contractors in Iraq. Condition ranges from excellent, to poor or incomplete.

Century International Arms - enter WASR 10/63 in the "search" box


Product ID: RI1188EY Condition: Fair
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle 5/16/14
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle. High Cap. Military stock, Pistol Grip & Flash hider. 7.62x39. Fair condition w/o mag.
Price: Dealer Login required. Consumers, please visit your local dealer for pricing.
[HR][/HR]
Product ID: RI1188EY Condition: Good
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle 5/16/14
GP WASR 10/63 rifle. High Capacity, Military stock, pistol grip & flash hider. 7.62x39. Good condition w/o mag.
Price: Dealer Login required. Consumers, please visit your local dealer for pricing.
[HR][/HR]
Product ID: RI1188EY Condition: Poor Incomplete
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle 5/16/14
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle. 7.62x39 High Cap , Military stock, Pistol grip & flash hider. Poor condition/Incomplete. W/O mag.
Price: Dealer Login required. Consumers, please visit your local dealer for pricing.Coming Soon
[HR][/HR]
Product ID: RI1188EY Condition: Very Good
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle 5/16/14
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle. High Capacity, Military stock, Pistol grip & Flash hider. 7.62x39. Very good condition w/o mag.
Price: Dealer Login required. Consumers, please visit your local dealer for pricing.
[HR][/HR]
Product ID: RI1188EY Condition: Excellent
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle 5/16/14
GP WASR 10/63 Rifle. 7.62x39. High Capacity, Military stock, Pistol Grip & Flash hider. Excellent condition w/o mag
Price: Dealer Login required. Consumers, please visit your local dealer for pricing.
[HR][/HR]
Login Status
Not logged in
» Login













Back to Top
© 2010 Century International Arms, Inc.​


It would be interesting to know the exact history and source of these, but of course these kind of details on these kind of rifles are secrets that are seldom if ever revealed.

At this point, these are the closest thing to a real military issue AKM, that actually saw service in a combat zone/hostile environment, that is available - other than a very few, highly sought after, and astronomically expensive papered bring-backs from Vietnam. Reportedly some of these have markings, numbers, etc. on them that are reminiscent of the "battlefield graffiti" one sees carved on some of the "battlefield pick-up" type stocks that came in from the Balkans.

WASR's with history - who'd a thunk it!


Right now I'm working on a way to order some of these.

Also trying to get more information on these, but I don't have the contacts and connections inside Century Arms that I used to.

And I'm sure that the five different U.S. contractors - SOC, Triple Canopy, etc. - who employed Ugandans as security in Iraq will not respond to any information requests.

I wonder if any of the various semi-automatic AR type rifles these companies also issued to their guards are available or will be coming up for sale.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,774 Posts
Seen these while browsing the other site.

Cool story but in the end it's still a WASR.

Now if they had paperwork then it would be another story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,599 Posts
Why would they have issued semi-auto AKs ? Other things about this also sound like baloney to me. I recall a few years ago someone linking to a sale of beat up WASRs that were supposedly used inside the U.S. for OPFOR training and the muzzles all had BFAs welded on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
There were also a bunch of DPMS AR's in the M4 configuration and WASR AES-10'B rifles that came from the same source.
ALL were semi-auto guns.
I too would like the exact details of their overseas service.
I missed out on the DPMS AR's and the AES-10's with the folding stocks.

Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,072 Posts
A contracting company we used that employed Iraqis to role play before we deployed had wasrs and sks with aforementioned welded on blank devices. That was in 06. I really dont see contractors throwing a fit about lack of fun switch, they are there to make money and very few get to select a weapon of their choice. Anybody else see the contract security guards in Kuwait that had the ACT LIKE A SOLDIER motivational poster behind them? Not all these guys are secret squirrels. Totally plausible sales IMO, however, Id guess they spent more time in combat around a DFAC than anything else.

Id pass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
In 2008 at Scania, Liberty and TQ, I only saw the Ugandan Mercenaries carrying what appeared to be M4s. Never understood why in full battle rattle coming off the road I had to show my CAC I.D. to these clowns before I could eat at a U.S. DFAC (mess hall). Sticks in my craw to this day. Sorry didn't mean to Hi Jack the thread!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,359 Posts
About two/three years ago I bought same wasrs that came from Quantico. Blank fired only. Dirty & cheap. Cleaned them & sold them for $450. There were at least 50 initially available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,803 Posts
There were also a bunch of DPMS AR's in the M4 configuration and WASR AES-10'B rifles that came from the same source.
ALL were semi-auto guns.
I too would like the exact details of their overseas service.
I missed out on the DPMS AR's and the AES-10's with the folding stocks.

Richard
Why would they have issued semi-auto AKs ? Other things about this also sound like baloney to me. I recall a few years ago someone linking to a sale of beat up WASRs that were supposedly used inside the U.S. for OPFOR training and the muzzles all had BFAs welded on.
They were selling them (WASR, AES, and DPMS) at a lgs near me. I passed. I too would like to know about the semi auto thing

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
I will see if I can find it but a year or two ago there was a pic of the Ugandan solider in Iraq that did have a Wasr-10 in semi only and guys were asking the same question of why no fun switch. So I belive that these are real but at the end of the day with no paper work or common knowlege that these were used in Iraq by the Ugandans all you have is a beat up or parts missing Wasr-10.


This isn't the same pic I was talking about but looks like there is no third pin in these.



Cant tell in this pic but it does look like a Wasr-10
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,342 Posts
Even if there was ironclad proof that some hired gate guard carried it overseas, does anyone really care enough to buy a beat up WASR?

Been a long, long, long war.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Even if there was ironclad proof that some hired gate guard carried it overseas, does anyone really care enough to buy a beat up WASR?

Been a long, long, long war.
Actually, as a collector, yes, which is the point of this thread.....though I can see where not everyone would feel the same way. They have a history that is unique and different than the WASRs in my collection that I or someone else bought new from the local gun store whose history - since being rebuilt from a military AKM into a WASR - was Romania ->Century Arms->Distributor and/or local gun shop->civilian purchaser.

It's kind of like the Yugo Mauser M48 sniper rifles that were used by the various forces in the break-up of Yugoslavia and the resulting ethnic slaughter. The little white Century Arms and/or Century Arms shipping receipt with the stock number that was unique to these drilled and tapped rifles, and differentiates them from a standard, undrilled one or a Mitchell's Mauser version, do give them a significant value premium over the others.

So while these WASRs aren't battlefield pick-ups from Saddam's forces or the various militant and terrorist factions who continue to fight with U.S. and Iraqi forces and among each other for control of the country, they were carried and did see some service in a combat zone/hostile environment (which I pretty much consider anywhere in places like Iraq, Afghanistan, or Syria to be) that differentiates them from the rifles in my collection or some armchair commando's mall ninja wet dream.

Would I at this point pay more for one of these than for any other used WASR? No. But would I like to pick up a few for whatever Century is selling them for plus whatever reasonable amount one of my friendly local gun stores would add to them? Oh hell yes. Again, my interest in AK's - beyond the fact that they are just plain cool and would be handy should I be attacked by those roving bands of tweakers and other criminal scum roaming the landscape as California and the U.S. in general spiral into crumbling 3rd World anarchy - is their history. To me, one of the things that makes even just the regular WASR rifles in my collection more desirable than some of the other AK's out there including my Saigas or the MAK-90 is the fact that they are made from genuine Warsaw Pact Cold War era military rifles....I lived in Europe during that period, and while these rifles didn't see combat they were just over the border, more or less pointed in my general direction, and during the 1979-80 period there was a very real and genuine concern that I would wake up one early one morning to find guys carrying them rolling down the streets of where I lived or worked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
I too have only a collector interest in these guns.
I would like to find one with the SOC-USA hand tag still on it.
Apparently some of the DPMS AR's had the tags (as reported on another forum)
One tag had a overseas phone number as well.
Across several forums I am seeing pictures of Ugandan Soldiers guarding US Bases while armed with WASR's & DPMS AR's.

Richard
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,774 Posts
You would think century would include some kind of paperwork with these rifles. After all, they are a buisness and they would profit by selling these for a couple hundred more if they had paperwork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
You would think century would include some kind of paperwork with these rifles. After all, they are a buisness and they would profit by selling these for a couple hundred more if they had paperwork.
That applies to most every surplus firearm that Century sells!

Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I am sure from a logistical standpoint, having a civilian company buying semi auto AKs to ship overseas is allot easier then trying to jump through all the NFA hoops.
This is my exact thinking on these also. Legality, initial cost, keeping them running, and resale value are all tied to this . No NFA nonsense to worry about makes them a lot easier to buy, possess, store, transport, issue, have repaired, sell when the time comes to replace them or they are no longer needed, etc. There are probably some insurance and various liability issues here to consider also, as anyone who has ever ran any kind of business or worked any kind of security position will understand.

If you are going to purchase a quantity of semi-auto military spec AK rifles, WASR rifles from Century Arms are your best and only real option. Besides all the surplus stuff for the collector and shooter markets (including some of the cobbled-together stuff they come out with) Century Arms is also a major distributer of military and law enforcement weapons....kind of like Bannerman or Sam Cummings' InterArms were back in the day. They have the connections to get and move stuff around in quantity, and at quantity pricing.

The WASR is the cheapest and most readily available "ready to shoot out of the box" AK out there...yeah, there are some nice rifles out there but they are more for the collector or shooter market,cost a lot more, and are not as readily and steadily available. And because the WASR is a standard AKM pattern rifle, replacement parts and repairs are not going to be a problem in an area blessed (?) with an abundance of AKM rifles.

Other considerations might be the same as those that motivated to Romanians to come up with the semi-automatic "G" rifles that were issued to militia and guard type forces (think of the WASR as the current production version of the "G"), and that caused many countries to issue second and third line troops, police/guard/militia forces, Colonial and native troops, etc. with obsolete or reduced capability weapons. In a lot of places in Africa, up until recently (and perhaps today still in some places) natives were allowed to own only muzzle loading or single shot weapons. It's a lot harder for someone start an uprising or wage a guerilla war when they have weapons from WW2 or even the Napoleonic Wars and you have FAL's and AK's. No racism or anything intended here, but without the leadership and command of a German, Englishman, or Frenchman, armed native troops (and this includes various Arab and other Islamic peoples) can be a cause for concern. Just because they are all from the same country and/or maybe have the same religion doesn't mean they all have the same tribal and ethnic allegiances doesn't mean they all like each other, and might not try to settle some kind of Hutu vs. Tutsi or Shia vs. Sunni kind of grudge or vendetta.

Also, should WASR rifles start showing up on the black market or in the hands of insurgents, it would be a lot easier to trace them back to their origin/source than all the various foreign military AK rifles that blanket that region. For Americans and English, the U.S. English language markings on them would be an immediate identifying factor. I find that even military guys I know who have spent a lot of time over in places like Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. generally don't have much of a clue as to origin, types, models, etc. of foreign military weapons - or sometimes even domestic ones - unless they are also collectors like us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
You would think century would include some kind of paperwork with these rifles. After all, they are a buisness and they would profit by selling these for a couple hundred more if they had paperwork.
Yeah, it's interesting that with some things where the history and origin would definitely add value they remain silent or know nothing, and with some things they make up stories to attempt to make them more appealing....like those post-war MAS 36 rifles that were supposedly hidden from the Germans in wine cellar caves under a castle by the French Resistance. For both collectors and researchers, knowing the origin of some of the weapons they sell would be very important. But I guess when they are trying to sell as many as they can as quickly as they can, to them this may not be a consideration....especially when the Century office people in Florida writing the ads for the items have no connection with the Century field people overseas who located and purchased them.

Also, I think there is often a tendency or desire to keep their sources confidential and protected, and in some instances their sources themselves may wish this also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
There is also some discussion about these semi-auto AKM and M-4 rifles on Ugandan sites by Ugandans who were employed as security in Iraq.

Additionally, it seems that these may also have been used by the Ugandans SOC employed in Afghanistan from 2007 to 2010.
 
1 - 20 of 90 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top