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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So one of the (many) reasons I can't sit down to watch modern war movies is the uniform nit-picky-ness I find that I busy myself with instead of following the story. One of these peeves is seeing on-screen soldiers without tie-downs on their weapons. It was common practice when i was in (and i imagine long before and after) that all the ancillary equipment that was on your weapon was tied down to the rifle somehow with a piece of gutted 550 cord.

Soldier Army Military Military camouflage Military organization
(pictured here is a soldier with proper tie downs for his optic and his PEQ laser.) [not my photo, don't claim credit]


That got me thinking; I cannot recall a single Iraqi soldier that I came into contact with having a tie down on his AK. I mean, I own MANY more AK variants personally than I do ARs, and guess what? My ARs have the proper tie downs....my AKs do not. Then i looked online... no examples that I could find there either. Is this a discipline that only AR/M4/M16 carrying nations practice? Has anyone seen an optic or light/laser tied down on an AK47/74? And where would you?...

Thanks Gents
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I suppose you're correct...being as there probably wasn't the level of bling on our tools before that. That being said, I see, especially in the Russian Federation, some pretty kitted out pieces. Do you know if there is, for instance, a Russian SOP for soldiers to tie down equiptment?
 

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Well, I suppose you're correct...being as there probably wasn't the level of bling on our tools before that. That being said, I see, especially in the Russian Federation, some pretty kitted out pieces. Do you know if there is, for instance, a Russian SOP for soldiers to tie down equipment?
Last I knew the Russians had to buy their equipment, so I doubt they have that SOP. US soldiers do it because they were issued the stuff and items like the PEQ and ACOG are "sensitive" items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Last I knew the Russians had to buy their equipment, so I doubt they have that SOP. US soldiers do it because they were issued the stuff and items like the PEQ and ACOG are "sensitive" items.
Interesting, I did not know that. Thank you for responding... although now that I'm not a paratrooper any longer and have had to pay for all my sweet gear, i guess i would be more inclined to tie it down than ever! haha:cool:

Next I would have to ask, does anyone else tie stuff down on their personal equipment? And how?
 

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Even the SOP in the US Military is unit level, not force wide.

I worked in SF support for guys with kitted out M4A1s starting in 1995, and was issued my own about 1998. "Tie downs" or dummy cords on a weapon was a foriegn concept.. When I went to LRS in 2007 was the first time I was introduced to it.

We used metal wire though. Using 550 cord (which melts) on a weapon is stupid for lack of a better word.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's interesting. I just know that as we passed 101st or 10th mountain guys it seemed pretty standardized. We were all in 18th Airborne Corps though so who knows what the bigger army did. And I agree that 550 is not the answer to every problem, but it's readily available and good for "impact mitigation". I guess if I burn alive with my rifle, who cares where my optic went?
 

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Dummy chording issue gear came into vogue for us in 07 as well. Its implementation was a clusterfuck as SOP dictated serialized gear needed to be tied down but didn't specify how. So some lance colonel would have an octopus of 550 wound around his 16 and others would use crap zip ties that snapped thanks to UV exposure. I think the most lost items were PEQ2 and the smaller ANPVS14 monoculars; it was difficult to lose trash like 7Bs and PSQ18s. Other constant losses were bayonets and M9s but the higher powers finally just kept the bayonets and M9s became a FOB issue item for brass and SNCOs that didn't feel like carrying around their brand new M4s to the chow hall.

I foresee a future where all US force multiplier add-on gizmos will have a lanyard loop if they are not there yet.

Back to the OP, I think a major issue is that most countries that run an AK as a primary service rifle issue only that and maybe a bayonet. Even Makarovs have a lanyard line though. Seeing Putins little green men in Crimea was a first for me seeing even near uniformity in optical enhancements from a Russian force.
 

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If the ''add-ons'' were made correctly with spring loaded detent pins like the ones on the M 4 lower to prevent them from falling out, service members would not have to ''tie everything off''. In addition it gave CSM's something else to jack a soldier up about!
 

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I won't lie, I could easily foresee someone losing a GPS or spare barrel, or nods if they weren't all tied off to your person in Ranger school. Even the hand mics and long whips were tied down to the radio itself.

.. Maybe we should have tied ourself off to each other with 550. I doubt we would have kept having to chase that one guy who kept falling asleep while droning at night and walking off into the woods. Oh, sensitive items..

As far as using wire or 550ing SI like optics and lasers/lights directly to the rifle? I just don't see the need on a civilian, range style rifle.
 

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I asked a buddy about this. He said paracord was used in Ranger training to secure Aimpoints in training. Otherwise, not common for anything.

Having not been in the military myself, the OP photo looks like a very new-in-the-bush setup. Like he walked off a plane with all that gear
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That photo was just the first example i could find of what i was talking about. I cannot, of course, speak for other units, but yes in Ranger school it was a MUST-DO SOP and in the 82nd Airborne (where i was anyway, an Infantry Battalion) it was part of our daily leaders inspections. We did not however take it to the extreme like in Ranger school, like tying down canteen tops to the canteens. And i can say from experience that when a sensitive item went missing, the first thing you'd be asked by the 1SG and SMJ was, "Did you check this trooper's tie-downs?"

Lol, this thread kinda jumped the rails. I personally like doing combat shooting events, team movement, entries, simulated casualty recovery and convoy ops. Rarely do I find myself "ten toes on the line" on a conventional range. I also lanyard my Glock to my kit after one of my teammates' sidearm became lost after a particularly dynamic exercise on our range. I guess i was curious if any of the members here took measures from preventing lost gear, ala Tie Downs. We tend to be pretty hard on a party dress, if you know what i mean. :p
 

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Most of what I've seen attached to an AK is done in such a way that it's not going to fall off.

A lot of the issued attachments for the M4 are held on with thumbscrews or the like, which can back out due to vibration or simply not giving the screw an extra quarter turn.

Putting 550 cord on an AK seems a sure and certain way to end up with melted nylon all over the rifle if you dump a few magazines.
 

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Seems like loctite on the threads or just using better mounts would be a more practical solution than wrapping cord all over the place.
 
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