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After leaving the military, he launched a new career as a contract killer who "has arranged for the murders of multiple people," the court papers charge. He allegedly used email to recruit four other ex-soldiers — from Puerto Rico, Germany and Poland — to provide security for a massive cocaine-smuggling operation that took them around the world. The cabal traveled to Thailand in March, the African nation of Mauritius in April, and the Bahamas in June to perform surveillance for the traffickers and soon signed on for a more nefarious task: murdering a law-enforcement officer, officials said.


Hunter enlisted two of the men, German sniper Dennis "Nico" Gogel and U.S. Army veteran Timothy "Tay" Vamakias in what he called a "bonus job" — a plot to murder a Drug Enforcement Administration agent and an informant in Liberia for $800,000. Visas and plane tickets were obtained, a submachine gun and .22 caliber pistols were ordered, and sophisticated latex face masks, which could make someone appear to be of another race, were shipped to Africa.




Team of contract killers led by ex-soldier 'Rambo' busted, prosecutors say - U.S. News


Wow my life is boring.
 

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Disgrace to the uniforms they once wore....hope they give them all the needle...
 

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Interesting story. It sounds like the contract killings were a set up, But also says Hunter did other killings. Who knows though, Media gets stuff wrong so much.

Reading closer it looks like the source for the other killings was Joseph Hunter talking to the informant. He may have been lying to get the job.

After leaving the military, he launched a new career as a contract killer who "has arranged for the murders of multiple people," the court papers charge.
"These were consummated, completed contract killings," Bharara said at a Friday press conference, without providing details of the killings, which occurred overseas.
 

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I might be overreacting, but I hate that the media has to put "ex US military" in the headline. I feel like alot of times they passively try to make it seem like it is the armed forces that causes people to do bad shit like this.
 

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This has been going on as long as there has been standing armies. My dads friend went to Viet nam 3 or 4 times. He would go out on trails and roads and put out sensors to track trucks and people. Then send in planes to bomb them. When he got out he went to Africa to work for the Dutch to protect diamond mines. He tried to get my dad to move over there every time he would come back here. He would always bring me back cool stuff. I went to see him a few years ago we had a long good talk he did a lot more than guard mines. He took out a book of poems and art. It was from Peter Badcock it had a picture of him and peter standing next to his Lotus europa in S.A. There were house mates there. He said nothing in the world match the feeling of the hunt. He said one day all his books and pictures would be mine. Those were some cool pics. One where they were all on horse back like cowboys except the had Fals and machine guns.
 

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will36, while I agree that the practice of ex soldiers loaning special services has been around since time immemorial, your father's friend was an adventurer. Nothing else in the world excited him more than the adrenaline of almost losing his life. He may have had to do bad things during his protection gigs in Africa, but the difference there is that he did not sign on to deliberately harm people.

The guys mentioned in the article went to loan their services to a drug cartel, a known criminal organization, and they would have been fine in harming innocents. It was a "sting", but the intended target was supposed to be an American law enforcement agent. I think that is the fundamental difference.
 

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For every one American citizen who'll stand up and show his respect for an American soldier you have fifty that talk amongst themselves about how we waste their money and kill for no reason. The press is always happy to cater to that crowd
 

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will36, while I agree that the practice of ex soldiers loaning special services has been around since time immemorial, your father's friend was an adventurer. Nothing else in the world excited him more than the adrenaline of almost losing his life. He may have had to do bad things during his protection gigs in Africa, but the difference there is that he did not sign on to deliberately harm people.

The guys mentioned in the article went to loan their services to a drug cartel, a known criminal organization, and they would have been fine in harming innocents. It was a "sting", but the intended target was supposed to be an American law enforcement agent. I think that is the fundamental difference.

Yeah your probably right on most parts. Except for the part about hobbling the ones they found stealing diamonds. Some of the things he talked about I can see why the streets ran red with blood in some places. Those people in that place are just crazy were then and still are now for the most part.
He shipped home a Toyota FJ with the military side seating and big rear door. I guess the salt spray from the trip over was to much . It was a total rust bucket by the late 80's. I wanted that thing so bad.
 

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For every one American citizen who'll stand up and show his respect for an American soldier you have fifty that talk amongst themselves about how we waste their money and kill for no reason. The press is always happy to cater to that crowd
I totally agree.

My uncle is a 90 yr old WWII veteran of the Pacific theater, and a very proud man. Once a week I drive him around on errands and stuff. It really baffles me how so many people can clearly see his WWII hat, yet don't say a word to him for his sacrifice. Ever since I was a kid, he has told me very little about his service, but I know he lost many friends and definitely saw some serious combat. On a more positive note, when people actually do say something to him, it absolutely makes his day.
 
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