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I want to thank everyone who has signed up to purchase our first Special Edition Rifle.


We "leaned" forward to make this happen quickly and InRange took big financial risks based on the poll I conducted in the planning stages of the SER project.

In the beginning, it looked like we were not going to come close to the number of rifles projected in the poll. But within a few weeks those numbers HAVE SURPASSED THE LAST SEAK PROJECT ON THE OLD BOARD!!!!

Because of all of you who faxed and mailed your orders (not only this board, but the old board as well), I can breathe a sigh of relief that the financial risk is gone. This marks a milestone achievement and reflects positively on our mission statement:

"Provide a free discussion board where advertisers and members work together to promote the acquisition, assembly, and ownership of some of the finest Kalashnikov variants available on the market...where both parties understand it's about the Kalashnikov, not the money."

With great gunsmiths, great vendors, and great members....I look forward to the successful future of this discussion board.

I hope to begin researching what it would take to acquire some "challenge coins" with our logo, etc. and make them available to our membership.

Again, my thanks to all of you !!!!

Troy
 

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"Challenge Coins"! :mrgreen:
 

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I just want to thank the people who frequent this forum and really make it a place worth spending time... I have learned much and am very happy to be one of the ones ordering the S.E.R., and thus my first AK variant.

Gotta question though... what are challenge coins?
 

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Challenge coins are a military tradition that started small, and got really big. Too big, really. Units with high esprit de corp would have them made.

Basically, anybody in the unit, or that has been in the unit is supposed to have a coin with them at all times. At any time, and I mean ANY time, somebody can 'challenge' you by dropping their coin. Everyone present must instantly produce their coin. If everyone produces a coin, the 'challenger' buys. If somebody or several can't produce their coin, they must buy. No place is safe from a challenge... I know people who shower with their coin, because you just never know.

Now, officers give out their own coins because they think we feel special when they give them to us. Some enlisted types, like Sergeants Major, will also have coins minted and give them out. It used to mean something, but now it's pretty much a business card.

My unit has had a few made, and they came out great and the cost was right.

We made them for my bro Eli, who was killed in Iraq. We sold the coins, and the proceeds went to Eli's family. We are AZ Guard, so most of us feel pretty strongly about our state. The coffee mug is because Eli was rarely seen without a cup of Joe.. and there was nothing we could have put on a coin that said 'Eli' more than a cup 'o joe.

We have also made unit coins, including some is solid silver, that are pretty cool. The coins for Eli are copper.. 'cause we're the copper state.

The scan doesn't do the coin justice, but you get the idea.

If you don't have somebody in mind to do your coins, I can find out who we used.


 

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History of the Military Challenge Coin

During World War I, American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in midterm to join the war. In one squadron, a wealthy lieutenant ordered medallions struck in solid bronze carrying the squadron emblem for every member of his squadron. He himself carried his medallion in a small leather sack about his neck.

Shortly after acquiring the medallions, this pilot's aircraft was severely damaged by ground fire. He was forced to land behind enemy lines and was immediately captured by a German Patrol. In order to discourage his escape, the Germans took all of his personal identification except for the small leather pouch around his neck. In the meantime, he was taken to a small French town near the front. Taking advantage of a bombardment that night he donned civilian clothes and escaped. However, he was without personal identification.
He succeeded in avoiding German patrols and reached the front lines. With great difficulty, he crossed no-man's land. Eventually, he stumbled into a French outpost. Unfortunately, the French in this sector of the front had been plagued by saboteurs. They sometimes masqueraded as civilians and wore civilian clothes. Not recognizing the young pilot's American accent, the French thought him to be a saboteur and made ready to execute him. Just in time, he remembered his leather pouch containing the medallion. He showed the medallion to his would-be executioners. His French captors recognized the squadron insignia on the medallion and delayed long enough for him to confirm his identity. Instead of shooting him, they gave him a bottle of wine.

Back with his squadron, it became a tradition to ensure that all members carried their medallion or coin at all times. This was accomplished through a challenge in the following manner, a challenger would ask to see the coin, If the challenger could not produce his coin, he was required to purchase a drink of choice for the member who had challenged him. If the challenged member produced his coin, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.
 

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Ah-ha, that explains the scene in E-Ring a few months back... Gotcha. I'm slowly learning all this military tradition and history. Military talk/interest was pretty taboo in my house growing up... the old man had had enough of it when he was drafted for Vietnam I think... In fact, I'll never forget coming home from high school to find my mom screaming at someone on the phone only to later find out it was a recruiter calling to talk to me... Alas, they were right, I'm way too thick headed and independent to make it through boot camp, let alone military service.

Alas I digress, sorry for hi-jacking the thread.

Back to your regularly scheduled thanking and challenge coin discussion...
 

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A big "thank you" to KF and Mr. Sellars for putting together the SER. A few of us have known for years what great AK work is done in Kodak, Tn. Now, others can enjoy.
 

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Yes indeed this site has great potential and the S.E.R. is a connection between all who will own one . A challange coin would be another token of connection for all the AK Brothers .
Perhaps it could lead to face time between like minded individuals .

Thanks Krinkfreak and to all responsible for this great meeting place !
 

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Yeah, and an AK is just too big carry around with you all the time....And I dont think bar owners or the cops would take too kindly to you slamming AKs down on bars all over the country
 

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In the Navy we never had anything quite that romantic. Big difference in the "warrior culture" of the two services. All we ever had were sponges and mops.
 

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Sidecarnutz said:
In the Navy we never had anything quite that romantic. Big difference in the "warrior culture" of the two services. All we ever had were sponges and mops.
+1
 

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In the Navy we never had anything quite that romantic. Big difference in the "warrior culture" of the two services. All we ever had were sponges and mops.
Actually some of us in the Navy DID have challenge coins, but they came about after we left the unit. I got mine though! Brother Sailor still in the teams got me mine.

A site 'challenge coin' sounds like a great idea!
 
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