AK Rifles banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am looking for sources for obsolete ammo reload data. I have a Lyman reload manual, two issues of Handloader Magazine, and I get American Rifleman magazine since I am a NRA member.

Every month American Rifleman has a section on reloading. Some are called Handloads that has load data for one round. These articles are half a page. The current issue (June 2022) has A Light-Recoiling .32 ACP Practice round. These monthly articles have data for just one type of bullet, powder, primer etc.. The other article is Loading Bench which is more in depth with 3 to 4 pages dedicated to a caliber. Example in December 2021 issue is 6.5 Swedish reload data for 4 different bullet weights. Sometimes both of these articles are in an issue but usually it is one or the other.

I know powder and bullet makers such as Speer has data on their websites for free. And I know there are other reloading manuals put out by Hornady, Lee, and others. Speer does have some 9mm Largo data, I am looking for more sources though.

I am thinking about getting the book Pet Loads. But Wolfe Publishing Group that published that book, other reloading books and three magazines including Handloader Magazine, has a website called LoadData that requires a subscription to use but they claim new loads are added daily.


I do have Cartridges of the World 13th Edition. I did not buy this book for reload info, I bought it as a reference for different types of ammo. It does list dimensions for case, primer type, and OAL. This book has some reloading data such as powder type and charge, bullet type and weight, velocity, energy, and source. Some just have FL for powder meaning factory load. It does not list starting or max powder just has one powder weight. It is not exactly a reloading manual and I do not know the accuracy of this book. The sources for each caliber list either a company (Hornady, Lyman, Hodgdon), a person's name, or state factory or military load. Sometimes it says source/comments and it lists a barrel length.

I have Ammo Encyclopedia 6th edition on the way. I bought it for just a reference like I did Cartridges of the World. I doubt it will be very useful for reloading.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JeepFan

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
For wildcat or obsolete cartridges where data is hard to find, QuickLoad can be a useful tool. I have 5 wildcats that aren't in any reloading books, so it comes in handy. It's not without faults though. Sometimes with straight walled cases it errors on the side of caution and will give you a significantly higher PSI and velocity reading than what you actually get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
For wildcat or obsolete cartridges where data is hard to find, QuickLoad can be a useful tool. I have 5 wildcats that aren't in any reloading books, so it comes in handy. It's not without faults though. Sometimes with straight walled cases it errors on the side of caution and will give you a significantly higher PSI and velocity reading than what you actually get.
Thanks for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,006 Posts
I'm hopping @43m1garand you started this thread wanting members to post what they do as far as reloading obsolete ammo. If so I'll start with an easy one that I load for.

Reloading 7.7x58 Japanese, how I do it,

This round has never been common here in the US. A good source used to be Mr. Nambu but sadly he passed a few years ago. From time to time you could also find high priced factory loads.

All the info I post is what has safely worked for me in my rifles. Your safety is up to you.

Maybe 20 years ago I picked up a very nice Type-99 in 7.7x58mm. I could be wrong but iirc it's a Kokura 34 Series. It's not sportered, has a non defaced MUM, AA sights, is matching and correct for the series. I had no ammo for it other than some crusty rounds I dug from battlefields in the PI.

This caliber could not be easier to load for as far as basic brass conversions and data.

Lots of people use 30.60 as a start. I use .270Win brass as I have nothing in that caliber. I keep my 30.06 for my US M-1s M1917s and such. Using .270 involves a small extra worthwhile step.

My process,
-Using .270 brass I run it through a FL 30.06 sizer to make it back into it's parent 30.06 cartridge. *note, never ever use a spray on lube, always use Imperial sizing wax or you are asking for stuck rounds in your die and tons of trouble.
-Now you have 30.06 brass. If you use 30.06 brass, obviously skip the above.
-Next run that brass through your FL 7.7x58 die with plenty of sizing wax.
-Now you have a very long 7.7x58 brass.
-Next trim your brass to 2.260" with your brass trimming tool. I like to cut off the bulk with a mini pipe cutter to save time along with wear and tear on my RCBS trimmer. Not really necessary though.
-Now you have a nearly complete 7.7x58 brass. Chamfer and deburr the case mouth and you are good to load your new made 7.7 brass.
-Bonus points if you uniform the primer pocket.
-Now load your cartridge as you would a factory piece of brass with book data. Be sure to work up your load safely.

For my 7.7x58 loads, I like to use IMR-4895 powder because I can/could stock it cheap and reload my many surplus rifles from .303, 8mm, 7.62x54, ,308 and even in a pinch I can load cheap 55gr 5.56 with it.

The original Japanese military 7.7x58 used a 181gr bullet at 2400fps. I use the Hornady #3131 174gr BT-FMJ for my 7.7x58 ammo. I use the proven charge of 42.0 of IMR-4895 in my Type-99 although I would suggest working your own load ladder for safety. That #3131bullet also works well in .303 Brit and 7.62x54r.

I can easily get 3 inch or under groups at 100yds with my load of a solid rest. It is very comparable to the .303 cartridge.

Here she is with and original Japanese clip in the rifle and some usable Mauser clips. All this ammo was made by me as I described above. It is really fun to be able to reload for shootable history. I'd like to edit with a full shot of the rifle and some original Japanese gear.


I hope this thread takes off.

If anyone is interested and as a follow up to WW2 Japanese reloading, I'll repost my more involved method for making 6.5x50 Japanese brass using .243Win brass and a RPK barrel stub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm hopping @43m1garand you started this thread wanting members to post what they do as far as reloading obsolete ammo. If so I'll start with an easy one that I load for.

Reloading 7.7x58 Japanese, how I do it,

This round has never been common here in the US. A good source used to be Mr. Nambu but sadly he passed a few years ago. From time to time you could also find high priced factory loads.

All the info I post is what has safely worked for me in my rifles. Your safety is up to you.

Maybe 20 years ago I picked up a very nice Type-99 in 7.7x58mm. I could be wrong but iirc it's a Kokura 34 Series. It's not sportered, has a non defaced MUM, AA sights, is matching and correct for the series. I had no ammo for it other than some crusty rounds I dug from battlefields in the PI.

This caliber could not be easier to load for as far as basic brass conversions and data.

Lots of people use 30.60 as a start. I use .270Win brass as I have nothing in that caliber. I keep my 30.06 for my US M-1s M1917s and such. Using .270 involves a small extra worthwhile step.

My process,
-Using .270 brass I run it through a FL 30.06 sizer to make it back into it's parent 30.06 cartridge. *note, never ever use a spray on lube, always use Imperial sizing wax or you are asking for stuck rounds in your die and tons of trouble.
-Now you have 30.06 brass. If you use 30.06 brass, obviously skip the above.
-Next run that brass through your FL 7.7x58 die with plenty of sizing wax.
-Now you have a very long 7.7x58 brass.
-Next trim your brass to 2.260" with your brass trimming tool. I like to cut off the bulk with a mini pipe cutter to save time along with wear and tear on my RCBS trimmer. Not really necessary though.
-Now you have a nearly complete 7.7x58 brass. Chamfer and deburr the case mouth and you are good to load your new made 7.7 brass.
-Bonus points if you uniform the primer pocket.
-Now load your cartridge as you would a factory piece of brass with book data. Be sure to work up your load safely.

For my 7.7x58 loads, I like to use IMR-4895 powder because I can/could stock it cheap and reload my many surplus rifles from .303, 8mm, 7.62x54, ,308 and even in a pinch I can load cheap 55gr 5.56 with it.

The original Japanese military 7.7x58 used a 181gr bullet at 2400fps. I use the Hornady #3131 174gr BT-FMJ for my 7.7x58 ammo. I use the proven charge of 42.0 of IMR-4895 in my Type-99 although I would suggest working your own load ladder for safety. That #3131bullet also works well in .303 Brit and 7.62x54r.

I can easily get 3 inch or under groups at 100yds with my load of a solid rest. It is very comparable to the .303 cartridge.

Here she is with and original Japanese clip in the rifle and some usable Mauser clips. All this ammo was made by me as I described above. It is really fun to be able to reload for shootable history. I'd like to edit with a full shot of the rifle and some original Japanese gear.


I hope this thread takes off.

If anyone is interested and as a follow up to WW2 Japanese reloading, I'll repost my more involved method for making 6.5x50 Japanese brass using .243Win brass and a RPK barrel stub.
Thanks for taking the time to share that info.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JeepFan

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
The older Lyman manuals have a lot of good data for obsolete calibers. I have most Handloader magazines back to the beginning. I use cast bullets a lot in obsolete calibers, so I look for data at the Cast Boolits website. George Nonte did a guide on Cartridge Conversions about 1970, and he usually had a little data.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The older Lyman manuals have a lot of good data for obsolete calibers. I have most Handloader magazines back to the beginning. I use cast bullets a lot in obsolete calibers, so I look for data at the Cast Boolits website. George Nonte did a guide on Cartridge Conversions about 1970, and he usually had a little data.
Thanks for the info. I will have to look for some old Lyman manuals.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top