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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up a russian tokarev mismatch and want to find out if it was refurbed/refinished.

Slide and barrel are both 1945 Izhevsk. Wartime expedient wood grips, tons of stamps all over the gun.
The serials are still sharp and dont seem to have been polished. In fact you can still see where metal has been raised around the numbers. But i wouldn’t expect all the other stamps on a wartime gun where they wanted them out the door ASAP.

any experts please chime in
Musical instrument Guitar Wood Guitar accessory String instrument
Wood Fashion accessory Everyday carry Musical instrument Belt
Sleeve Wood Gas Font Auto part
Tire Wheel Bicycle frame Bicycle tire Automotive tire
Wood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Grey Automotive design
Wood Bicycle part Composite material Metalworking hand tool Bumper
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have been a long time TOK Collector & have owned & read all that I could on this subject ? And have, at one time or another owned all of them, except the North Korean Type 68 ! Duncan Long has a book on the subject, that is about as exhaustive as possible ,on the markings, dates, variants as exists on the subject ! Saying all this, I looked your gun over & I believe this to be a genuine late wartime arsenal manufacture or remanufactured pistol ! Many things did & did not take place during this time of Total War, that were out of the ordinary ? The Soviets were on the move as much & as fast as possible toward Berlin ! Especially, the armaments manufacturers & their approval & proofing as well as the documentation~registration & distribution networks ! I highly suspect these to be some of these extra markings you mentioned & the extra or the additional ones ? Thisis what makes some wartime weapons so valuable compared to the standard production & procured ones, it is these extra markings. As well as the poorer finishes & undone or not-completed processes that in some cases makes them truly rare ! This is especially true of the Germans & what they had control over during ( late wartime ) ! Making some guns truly rare & worth thousands of dollars extra now ? The reason for this is that the Germans kept meticulous records & were highly organized till the very end ! The Soviets were not or won't tell to this day what some of their wartime coding was for on specific weapons etc.? That said, your Tokarev, is of significantly more value & rarer than a pre or post war Tokarev & even ( most ),wartime ones ! I would put it in the $1500 to & 2000 dollar range & that increasing every years there won't be any more 1945 year model pistols made & with no-import markings to boot, it is a keeper just as it is ! Arsenal rework or not & it may be worth more if it is a wartime or era rework ! Some Kreighof Nazi era reworks are worth twice as much & rarer than than a standard one ! Another example is the ware time Dura-aLuminum P-38"s & the Grey Ghost P-38"s ! And the B-Series Nazi era Checkoslovakian model 38 w/saftey added ! Another two, that come to mind is the Saur 38H thats of too many wartime variants to list & the Hungarian Frommer Pistols with both safety & caliber changes ? These changes in the norm make them of considerable more rarity & value than their standard models ! I could go on & on but let me say this one of the most knowledgeable folks I've ever known was Sydnis Rachwal & his son David Rachwal they are truly experts in this feld ! David Rachwal has a website Handguns of the World just type in his name ! He should know much more than I do hope this helps you out ?
Sincerely & Respectfully !
JOHN D WATSON

Thank you for your extensive reply. So in short it is quite possible that it is a wartime rework/refurb or „parts bin mixmaster“? I’d be happy with that, I think it’s very fitting with the history of soviet WW2 small arms. Of course there is no way to know for sure unless WW2 arsenal markings get declassified by Russia.

As for your estimated value, I guess its not worth as much over here in Switzerland as it is in the US, we just don‘t have as big a collector community as the US. FWIW I paid 380$ out the door for it, so I think i made a good deal.



@everyone else who complimented the gun, thank you :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No expert. It looks a little bit too good for wartime production. But it still has the duo tone finish from heat treatening which maybe is an indicator for original finish?
I was thinking maybe as the war was winding down and the Soviet Union wasn’t as desperate for arms as in 1942 and 1943 they could invest just a little more time in finishing. Just a theory though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Bicycle part Rim Auto part Bicycle drivetrain part Bumper


The barrel has a different serial as well.
The small parts only have single digits and barely visible stamps, none of which match frame, slide or barrel.

This gun really puzzles me. No refurb markings, but clearly mismatched. I find it hard to believe that it would be assembled privately or commercially from spare parts, there arent any commercial markings on it, and it being privately assembeled in either the soviet union/russia or in Switzerland before import markings were required seems unlikely.

Would someone who speaks russian translate the diagram PMB posted? It seems there is a lot of useful information in it.
 
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