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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if what this plate means is obvious to other army guys. This is my new license plate for my 1971 BMW R75/5 motorcycle, which I have owned since new.

V11Bplate_zpslejplybq.jpg


-Don- Reno, NV
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Veteran 11 Bravo, Infantry
I guess it wasn't that clear. You're right about the MOS, but not the "V". The problem is that it was supposed to be a motorcycle plate and they only allow me to pick a total of four letters or digits.

However, by mistake, they sent me two large car plates instead of a single small motorcycle plate. On a car plate, they allow five characters/digits. I discovered that this large car plate fits fine on my motorcycle with an adapter plate I made. And I was told that the cops don't care about the plate size. So I will have a large plate with V11B.

But I was hoping the "V" would be more obvious for what it stands for.

It would have been clearer if I could have added that extra letter. And I could have, if I knew I would get a car plate by mistake.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

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11 Bravo Infantry veteran? Me. A Company 1st Battalion 1st Infantry Brigade summer graduating class US Army Infantry school 1986.
 

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In Ohio the Motorcycle plates are offered for special order (vanity etc) but I do not pay the extra for that.
You can get a veteran marking for free., but it just says 'VET'., I was in the parking lot of a grocery store and a women asked me " are you Veterinarian"., I guess I looked quizzical in answering "no". Oh., she says I saw the "VET" on your motorcycle plates and thought..., . I explained the reference to her.:)
Our car plates are free for Purple Heart, Medal of Honor and POW. But only one vehicle and not a motorcycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Vietnam 11 Bravo?
Yeah, but I guess it wasn't as clear as I thought as that didn't seem to be anybody's first guess. If I could have known that I would get a large plate, it could have been "VN11B", which would have been clearer.

But if I could get six letters, it would have been "RVN11B" which would be even a better match for the army. Orders for Vietnam always said "RVN" (Republic Vietnam).

Now I am wondering if "N11B" for "Nam-11B" would have been clearer. If V11B was taken, I would have tried for N11B. But I got my first choice, at least for the four characters max on a cycle plate.

But I am kinda glad I got a car plate for my cycle, as long as every cop who sees it doesn't stop me. If I find that happens too much, I will return the plate to NV DMV and ask for a cycle plate with the same "V11B".

-Don- Reno, NV
 

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I did not get the connection of the 'V' but I probably would not get the 'N' reference either. Now RVN.,I get it.
Welcome home.., fellow 11B here., A Co, 2nd Bat, 22nd Reg, 25th Infantry Dv.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did not get the connection of the 'V' but I probably would not get the 'N' reference either. Now RVN.,I get it.
Yeah, but I guess that "V11B" is the best I can do with just four spaces. But I wonder if I could have asked for a car plate (as I got by DMV's mistake anyway) with "VN11B", Which would be a lot clearer. The "RVN11B" is one letter over the limit on any NV Vet plate.
Welcome home.., fellow 11B here., A Co, 2nd Bat, 22nd Reg, 25th Infantry Dv.
Same to you. I mainly served the Central Highland Jungles between or near An Khe & Pleiku, but also was in the 1970 Cambodia incursion.

B-3-8, 4TH Div.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In Ohio the Motorcycle plates are offered for special order (vanity etc) but I do not pay the extra for that.
You can get a veteran marking for free., but it just says 'VET'., I was in the parking lot of a grocery store and a women asked me " are you Veterinarian"., I guess I looked quizzical in answering "no". Oh., she says I saw the "VET" on your motorcycle plates and thought..., . I explained the reference to her.:)
Our car plates are free for Purple Heart, Medal of Honor and POW. But only one vehicle and not a motorcycle.
Here, there is an added $30.00 yearly fee even to renew a Vet plate, but all the money goes to some type of program to support some type of NV state Vet program.

IIRC, that fee is waved for disabled vet plates. Perhaps for some others too.

Here in Nevada, it says "Veteran" even on driver's licenses, as long as the NV DMV gets a copy of your DD214. I have it on my driver's license, but it's in small print and one would have to know to look for it to even notice such. But there is no added fee for that.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

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Yeah, but I guess that "V11B" is the best I can do with just four spaces. But I wonder if I could have asked for a car plate (as I got by DMV's mistake anyway) with "VN11B", Which would be a lot clearer. The "RVN11B" is one letter over the limit on any NV Vet plate.Same to you. I mainly served the Central Highland Jungles between or near An Khe & Pleiku, but also was in the 1970 Cambodia incursion.

B-3-8, 4TH Div.

-Don- Reno, NV
Yes., we crossed over into Cambodia crossing the Rach Cai Bac River along with other Mechanized units of the 1st of the 5th Mech and 3/4 Cav. around May 9, 1970 +/-. In Mechanized Infantry we moved a lot and usually stayed in the field for 45 days at a stretch. Though it depended on the mission. Anything from RIF to Artillery Fire Support Base security or reaction to activity with other units etc. Cambodia was a trip of pretty much activity.
 

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If I saw this for the first time, I'd think it was an 11B infantry guy who earned a V device - probably on a bronze star.
 

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It's a secret code for the guys who stand in the tank exhaust on a cold day and cook coffee on our heater exhaust in the morning. They usually never have enough water, Copenhagen or MRE's, but they are really handy for peeking around corners before your Tank crosses the street in a city.
If cross attatched their XO will want to know why any Platoon needs 2000 gallons of JP5 a day and swear you're selling it on the black market.





then he will ask if you have any Copenhagen.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If I saw this for the first time, I'd think it was an 11B infantry guy who earned a V device - probably on a bronze star.
Well, at least the "infantry" part is clear.

No fancy medals here. Just the usual common stuff. I was once shot at while in a helicopter. IIRC, it was my very first chopper ride ever. I didn't do a thing. That gave me the air medal for "being in combat from the air". But I would have also received it later anyway for having so many flights in a combat zone, even if there was no action at all.

I received several mickey-mouse medals from simply being there, no action required on my part. That air medal of mine is just one example of many.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's a secret code for the guys who stand in the tank exhaust on a cold day and cook coffee on our heater exhaust in the morning. They usually never have enough water, Copenhagen or MRE's, but they are really handy for peeking around corners before your Tank crosses the street in a city.
If cross attatched their XO will want to know why any Platoon needs 2000 gallons of JP5 a day and swear you're selling it on the black market.

then he will ask if you have any Copenhagen.
MRE? WTF is a MRE?

Yeah, I really know what it is, but not when I was in Vietnam. I think MRE's came out in the 1980's or so.

It was all C-rations when I was in Vietnam. And most of those were wasted. Cans opened and buried (so they would spoil before enemy troops would find them). We usually had no problems getting more than enough C-rations, so we were picky about which ones we would eat. The NVA & VC were probably a lot less picky than we were.

MRE's, I hear, were actually voted on by US troops before they were accepted by the US military. An all volunteer army is treated much better in every way possible. And pay is better.

During the draft, not many cared what we had to eat. Any pay is low (by comparison).

It seemed all the worse C-rat meals were made by Oscar-Myer. As if they didn't care about us. And it was more than just my opinion. After I got out of the army, I made sure I never bought anything from Oscar-Myer.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

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Well, at least the "infantry" part is clear.

No fancy medals here. Just the usual common stuff. I was once shot at while in a helicopter. IIRC, it was my very first chopper ride ever. I didn't do a thing. That gave me the air medal for "being in combat from the air". But I would have also received it later anyway for having so many flights in a combat zone, even if there was no action at all.

I received several mickey-mouse medals from simply being there, no action required on my part. That air medal of mine is just one example of many.

-Don- Reno, NV
During my year in Iraq, I never even got shot at or bombed once. Convoys ahead of me and behind me would get hit, but never mine. The troops joked that I had an invisible force field around me. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
During my year in Iraq, I never even got shot at or bombed once. Convoys ahead of me and behind me would get hit, but never mine. The troops joked that I had an invisible force field around me. :)
My worse time in Vietnam, by far, was my fist month. In fact, was the worse time of my entire life.

For my fist action, I was in Vietnam, with my feet on the ground, for less than two minutes. Perhaps was less than one minute. It was funny in a way. Nobody got hurt, but here is what happened. We just arrived (on United Airlines, believe it or not) at the Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, Airport. We get off the plane, plane takes off fast, we where just off the runway and it's roll-call time, as the army always does when moving many troops. They called no more than three names and INCOMING!!!. Sirens sound off, all kinds of noise and chaos, including mortal rounds hitting the ground about 200 meters (everything is metric in the army--at least in those days) away from us. All of us FNG's (new guys) didn't know what to do and we all ran in all directions (except toward where the mortars were landing!). Just like a bunch of chickens with their heads cut off.

It took about an hour to find us all and continue that roll-call. We were all there and nobody was injured.

I remember what I was thinking at the time. I recall somebody saying during my stateside training that Cam Ranh Bay was the safest place to be in Vietnam. I am there for less than a few minutes and we have incoming. I then doubted if I would get out of Vietnam alive. But after my first month, of rain, mud and rather heavy combat at times, things got quite a bit better, for the most part.

Oh, BTW, one thing I forgot to mention. I arrived in Vietnam on 3, September 1969. That was the same day Ho Chi Minh died. I just wonder who told him I arrived.;)

-Don- Reno, NV
 
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