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I'm trying to take some good pictures of my rifles for a photo album type thing, but I am photography ignorant. I keep getting glare from flash, shadows, etc.

What are the basic rules for good photos?

I know lighting is huge, but what's best?
Backgrounds? Outdoors?

I've seen some real good photos from the members here, and mine always end up mediocre.


ETA: I'm working with a 2.0 megapixel digi-cam, not great, but it has taken some good pictures when I'm lucky....
 

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I always have a problem with the digital camera, the pictures always came out fuzzy or out of focus . I f I want somthing better then a snapshot I must use a tripod to steady the cam. the shutter speed on a digital camera is slow and my hands are not steady enough. It also helps to use the setting marked "action " as it seems to speed up the shutter speed a bit .

Another tip is to learn to use the button properly, on mine I have to press the button halfway to auto focus then press all the way to shoot. Kind of like a two stage trigger on a fine target rifle . It took me a while to get the feel of it .

The great thing about digital is if you mess up 9 out of 10 pictures you just delete the bad and keep that one great shot . good luck !
 
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take them inside. turn off the flash. light it from a couple of different directions to minimize shadows. use a tri-pod. take on largest format and highest resolution. then downsize appropriatley! if pics must betaken outside do it early or late in the day. mid-day will wash everything out flat/dull. fill flash wil help outside pics. get rid of background clutter. fabric of some kind helps set off objects (that's why all those pics with accessories look so good). wood tables work well, but make sure you can see a wall so it won't "flatten the pic out"

this pic is with a 3.0 megapix carmera on the med size setting with lowest quality (should be about equal to your 2.0)



same recipe for some stuff i sold



they always turn out pretty decent with this recipe. it usually takes me 5-6 tries to get it right. take a pic, then view it full size on the computer, then make adjustments,and take new pic til it looks OK.
 

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THS said:
What are the basic rules for good photos?
Never use a flash.

It is real cheap to use Mother nature or also to invest in say 3 6500K bulbs and reflectors from your local Home Depot.

6500 Kelvin is equivilent to sunny day light. But you can use various home products as difusers to set whatever "mood" lighting you choose



Can even build you a light box real cheap using PVC.

My photography improved dramatically when I actually read my owners manual and researched White Balance on the web.

Also I use Ken Lunde advice located at the bottom of his wallpaper page.

http://www.praxagora.com/lunde/firearms.html
 

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Rule number one..................good ambient lighting vs." flash" in any form...of digital camera....

Then go to Sony image Station and sign up using a blind link or a bud"s premiem Numbers....then you direct link pics......

Good posting.
 

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Lunde recently posted pics of his "studio" in which he achieves his great photos.

You'd be surprised at what really good results you can get with the bare essentials.



It just takes some experimenting to find what works best for you. It can be frustrating but is all part of the fun.

Some links you can check out and may find helpful are...

http://www.photoxels.com/tutorial_white-balance.html

http://www.urbanfox.tv/workbooks/anycam ... alance.htm

http://www.livingroom.org.au/photolog/t ... orials.php

http://www.photo-shop-tutorials.net/dig ... rials.html

http://www.digitalsecrets.net/secrets/iCC2.html

I got my idea on how to build an afforbale set up from this thread (registration may be required)

http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showt ... p?t=328550
 

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What they said..but none of that stuff is a replacement for good composition... that's what sets the good ones apart from great ones. Some people will never, ever get it. It's art. The technical stuff just makes your well composed photos look that much greater.

Take an assssssload of pictures. Move things around, both the stuff in the picture, and your point of view. One or two of your shots will stand out from the hundreds that you take, where everything just comes together. Now that we don't have to buy film, everyone can afford to shoot like that. You can also crop the pics to help with composition.

Focus is also critical. Having control over what is in focus, and what is not is a powerful tool to make good pics (you can draw the viewers eye to exactly the place you want).

Background color is important, especially with automagic cameras. If you use a light colored background with an evil black rifle, the aperture will close, and you won't get any detail on your black rifle (without lots of light). So, dark subject, dark-ish background. Same deal with the light colored stuff. Match the range of brightness with the background to the subject. Light subject, light-ish background.

Learn to use your camera.
 
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