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My experience with Saiga rifles so far has been not great:



I purchased two Saiga rifles, a 223, and a 308, from a guy on arms was. The 223 bolt was unable to ratchet back. The seller incredibly paid for shipping to and from back and replaced it. It turned out from what he said that the manufacturer had put a wrong part in which was hitting the magazine.



I am not a overly gun-technical guys so I cannot tell you exactly what was wrong, nor with the other rifles mentioned herein.

The 223 that was sent as replacement seems to be firing fine.


Then I found out that the 308 was jamming and ripping the bullets apart. Once again the same guy stunningly paid for all shipping and replaced the rifle.



The 308 sent as replacement that I currently have does not jam as much, but, I do not consider it to be a reliable weapon as it still jams I would say approximately 1 out of 10 shots. In a life-threatening situation that is unacceptable. A gun should fire and sure-fire in my opinion. In a life-threatening situation, one cannot say: "Oh sorry guys, have a problem here, let me fix it, and I get back with you; timeout." Yeah right.



So far that's three Saiga guns that in one way or the other have not work correctly to one degree or another. All three of these rifles mentioned above were brand-new.



I then purchased a 7.62×39 Saiga rifle from a gun store in Texas online that was manufactured by EAA, or modified by them. This was also a brand-new rifle. This rifle also has major jamming issues. Once again unbelievably this guy is also willing to take the gun back, and this time not exchange it, but refund me everything, including all shipping involved.



I am currently seeking a replacement 7.62 x 39 of which I have an ad running in the seeking to buy in this forum, preferably with wood, but, it cannot have the pistol grip or a threaded muzzle, a muzzle flash, etc., as once again we can have only one military aspect and the detachable magazine covers that, and that's it. If anybody has one that fits these needs please send me a message.

Thankfully the prices of these Saiga 7.62×39 rifles have dropped and I see online they are going for around $500 now, which is not so bad, relatively speaking to today's environment. I am aware that they used to be much cheaper, but, at least does come down to where it was.



With all now four rifles that have had major jamming, ripping bullets apart, etc., issues, many different types of ammunition have been tried, and many different types of magazines-meaning different manufacturers-and all proper ammunition and magazines have been used. There is been diligent trying to fix the issues by first and foremost making sure the ammunition and magazines were removed as possible suspects. Please believe me so we avoid this issue which is a non-issue.



I live in New York State and I purchased these after the New York Safe Act was passed. We are allowed only one military aspect on a rifle. This led me to very few choices other than a shotgun, which already had, I wanted more than a shotgun, and I wanted at least one gun with a detachable magazine, which is a military aspect, which pretty much left very few rifles that were "highly proficient" in a SHTF type situation, self-defense, and the like.



I did come to this forum and other forums alike and found overall excellent reviews of the Saiga rifles and the AK-47 rifles, and such. I could not buy the AK 47 rifles because of my state laws, nor can I convert my rifles due to the same laws.



I also looked at the Benelli 223, the Remington 308, and the M1 Garand. The Benelli I found too many reviews questioning its reliability. The Remington was a 308 which I find to be too large an impact load for a primary self-defense weapon. And the M1 is just too expensive for my budget. Plus it also is a 308 and I wanted something smaller in the lines of 223 or 7.62. And I find the shotgun to have too much of a recoil to be used a primary self-defense weapon.



I am not posting this for purposes of seeking solutions to the problems. I am posting this because reasonably I am utterly perplexed as to what is going on...



Is this normal for these rifles to do this type of jamming and such in general? Are these rifles intended generally for people who are very handy and made in such a way that they need to be constantly tinkered with, or, it is assumed that they are going to have problems and not be generally assumed to not fire correctly, initially at least? Can it be just a string of nothing but bad luck? It would seem almost impossible that almost every one of these rifles I've had has had major issues.



I am not knocking these rifles. I am not in any way intending to offend anybody for own these rifles. I still believe in them, and want to and somehow some way believe I will get it all straightened out.



The time money and energy expenditure to straight all us out has been tremendous. At all to that all of the stress and frustration and such.



I am venting. I'm also asking for input opinions insight etc. from you experienced people as to why you think this is going on.

It bears repetition: I've had many expert gun friends who know what they're doing who helped during the entire process with all these rifles and many types of magazines, all correct, and many types of ammunition, all correct, were used with all the above mentioned rifles with troubles. So please steer away from that, which is understandable, but, bullets and magazines were not the problems 100% for sure. It was the rifles.



I have a friend who is a gun expert in California who has AR-15's and he fires them and they fire, for my understand pretty much every time. That's it. He's telling me to get out of these rifles and get into the 15's, but, again, because of the laws in New York State, I am handcuffed. I would rather stick with these rifles as I'm way down the road and it's far to go back, I still like them, I just want all of this to stop and have reliable rifles. I am also not handy at all so I cannot tinker with these rifles; I need rifles were in their loaded their fired and they fire, generally, within reason, taking into account that yes things do happen, but not to this level. I don't think that's too much to ask.



Your feedback input opinions insights and such would be massively appreciated.
 

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First of all, your positive expereince with those gun dealers is heartening. Too often we only hear the bad stuff on the intenernet about gun dealers, and it's refreshing that customer service isn't completely dead. I have almost always received great service from dealers all over the country, and it's likely everyone else has as well. It's just that internet complaints are loud. It's good to know that the industry as a whole handles customer service appropriately still.

I have no idea about the Saiga's problems. I've had two, a .308 and a .223, and they've been fine. I traded the .308 for the FMP G-3 I currently have, and I still have the .223. I bought them a long time ago, right when people started figuring out how to convert them to PG configuration. Because they were older, maybe they put them together better. Maybe the guy that assembled mine had just the right amount of vodka to do things correctly. I know the Russian arms industry has gone through some changes, as has the US market, both of which may have resulted in rifles made being less satisfactory. There is also a posiibility, especially if you bought these in a pistol grip configuration, that whomever did the conversion here in the states screwed it up in the effort to get ahead of the various laws and the panic. It wouldn't be the first time that a push to meet higher production resulted in lower quality. If they were converted to pistol grip guns, I have a feeling that it's more likely this that was the problem.

There are several firms that are first class at fixing AK based rifles and some that specialize in Saigas. I haven't any names to give you, simply because I never bothered to find any since mine fortunately work, but they are definately out there. Plenty of them are on this board. I'd get down to the Saiga portion on the forum and find out who to send it to. Then you will have a first class rifle that works.

"A man's gotta know his limitations" is solid advice in all things. Cars, homes, guns, whatever, sometimes it's better to just pay someone else to do the job right from the begining. I won't hesitate to dive in and try my hand at many things, but every once in a while I figure out it's better to just have it done.

There's obivous cost involved with getting the rifle fixed by someone else. I feel that it's probably worth it for you to just foot that bill.
 

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What you describe is not normal for Saiga rifles in original configuration. That said, Saigas are frequently modified by less-than-qualified gunsmiths so when you buy a modified one you are rolling the dice.
+1

as soon as it has been modified by a less than reputable gunsmith, their reliabilty goes out the window. A standard non-modified saiga should run like a champ
 

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Discussion Starter #4
First of all, your positive expereince with those gun dealers is heartening. Too often we only hear the bad stuff on the intenernet about gun dealers, and it's refreshing that customer service isn't completely dead. I have almost always received great service from dealers all over the country, and it's likely everyone else has as well. It's just that internet complaints are loud. It's good to know that the industry as a whole handles customer service appropriately still.

I have no idea about the Saiga's problems. I've had two, a .308 and a .223, and they've been fine. I traded the .308 for the FMP G-3 I currently have, and I still have the .223. I bought them a long time ago, right when people started figuring out how to convert them to PG configuration. Because they were older, maybe they put them together better. Maybe the guy that assembled mine had just the right amount of vodka to do things correctly. I know the Russian arms industry has gone through some changes, as has the US market, both of which may have resulted in rifles made being less satisfactory. There is also a posiibility, especially if you bought these in a pistol grip configuration, that whomever did the conversion here in the states screwed it up in the effort to get ahead of the various laws and the panic. It wouldn't be the first time that a push to meet higher production resulted in lower quality. If they were converted to pistol grip guns, I have a feeling that it's more likely this that was the problem.

There are several firms that are first class at fixing AK based rifles and some that specialize in Saigas. I haven't any names to give you, simply because I never bothered to find any since mine fortunately work, but they are definately out there. Plenty of them are on this board. I'd get down to the Saiga portion on the forum and find out who to send it to. Then you will have a first class rifle that works.

"A man's gotta know his limitations" is solid advice in all things. Cars, homes, guns, whatever, sometimes it's better to just pay someone else to do the job right from the begining. I won't hesitate to dive in and try my hand at many things, but every once in a while I figure out it's better to just have it done.

There's obivous cost involved with getting the rifle fixed by someone else. I feel that it's probably worth it for you to just foot that bill.
Good input
Thanks
 
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