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Any of you guys do this for a living?? WOOOOOOO that is a hard way to make a living. I set forms for a 40x60 shop with 2 drive in ramps. There were four of us and we started at daylight. Got 98 degrees today quick.

We had a backhoe to work with I could not imagine doing that without one.


My hat is off to anyone that does this 5 days a week. :eek:
 

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I did concrete work as a Summer job during college in '85 & '86.

I worked at a pre-stressed plant that made "T"'s, deck panels and "I" beams all used in road construction. We had to string cables, pull tension on the cables, tie on reinforcing steel("rebar"...), set the forms, pour the mud then cover everything with plastic and apply steam heat to cure overnight.

Show up the next morning and uncover everything, remove the forms, cut the cables and remove the parts.

Repeat.

Days were long, work was hard but it was good experience. And I was making good money for the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We have to go back tomorrow and stretch wire, add rebar , and plastic. And do something with turn buckles . When this is done we will have the only bodyshop in a county seat of 5000 people.

The first bodyshop in the county to have a Frame machine and heated paint booth. 3 of us decided to be a big fish in a small pond. :grin: This is also the highest Deer collision recording county in the state.

With this shop completed we will have 2 buildings 1 for bodywork and frame work the other just for painting.
 

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bluezerosix said:
I did concrete work as a Summer job during college in '85 & '86.

I worked at a pre-stressed plant that made "T"'s, deck panels and "I" beams all used in road construction. We had to string cables, pull tension on the cables, tie on reinforcing steel("rebar"...), set the forms, pour the mud then cover everything with plastic and apply steam heat to cure overnight.

Show up the next morning and uncover everything, remove the forms, cut the cables and remove the parts.

Repeat.

Days were long, work was hard but it was good experience. And I was making good money for the time.
Im a draftsman at a precast plant, and back when I started I had to work out in the plant for several months. needless to say they tried to killl me out there. I was the office guy and they held it against me.
 

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One of my ex g/f's dad's was a concrete finisher. the guy made great money, but he was only 45 and looked like he was 70. His knees were totally shot and his back was going too. tough way to make a living for a lifetime.
 

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I watch them do it every day. No thanks. It's flat work at heights, high rise buildings.

Not only do they have to do the side forms, but the have to build the "ground".
 

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machineguneddie said:
it is a tough job, I used to drive a mixer truck and would never want to do flat work for a living.
Flat work is the easiest concrete work there is. Concrete was one of the first real jobs I ever had and I would've loved to get in on flat work. I started working with a crew doing footings and foundations during the summers when I was 15. We used the 2' x 8' plywood forms with the metal bands across... new ones weighed about 90 lbs but had sharp corners, old ratty ones would soak up water and form oil and weighed more like 120lbs. It was the first time I ever worked around adults that would swear not only around me, but at me... and if I didn't work fast enough they were throwing wooden stakes at me. I learned a whole new vocabulary that summer. In all my time as a concrete worker I had done it all from stripping a duplex in 104 deg heat to being knee deep in iced over water breaking ties and flipping hardware under water. I worked summers through HS, and after that my first winter... that was that. I was burned out at 19.

On the other hand, I got to work outside all day, and was never in better shape. Concrete work is/was some of the hardest work there is.. those guys earn every penny.
 
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Try doing it in body armor with a rifle.
You can barely see it in this pic, but behind me there is at least 50 trucks worth of fresh concrete poured into a new approach road for a base. 10 men, three days, and a whole lotta suck.

 

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I bet even the Julio's would contest that it would be harder doing it in Iraq with body armor and a rifle.

You can make good money. Irregardless of pay, you'll be working for your money.
 

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I've been doing concrete for 14 years. It is tough work, but you get used to it or quit. The toughest part normally is the old, miserable ,drunk screaming at you all the time. (if i was old, drunk and miserable, that would be me! :goof: )
Flat work is the quick way to make some dough. But once it starts to cure , you are working constantly for 2 hours straight (given the size, outside temp and if in direct sun).
I did a slab yesterday. Only 17 yards, but it went from sinking in to hard in a half hour. I had to have someone spraying it down with a hose as i ran a power trowel over it, trying to get a decent finish on it.
The second load took off faster then the first. Retarder helped for laying it down, but the sun cooked it right out.

Yeah, it's a tough job, but it's all i know now.
Most people who look like they are seventy, most likely a drinker. (Hell, most of us in this business are alkies, drug addicts or both. Or recovering)
 

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I fell in some wet concrete once, That count?
 

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petro said:
Most people who look like they are seventy, most likely a drinker. (Hell, most of us in this business are alkies, drug addicts or both. Or recovering)
That was the type of crews I worked with... I'd show up at the job sight the next day and find some guys in their cars sleeping off a hard night of drinking, womanizing and snorting up coke, ready to go for a full days work. When I came back from my first summer, the entire crew from the last summer had been fired. Same went for the next. Like I said, I was probably the most educated teenager in my HS.

On the upside, anything after that is a snap! But once a construction worker, always a construction worker... and every now and then it leeches out amongst the cubicle farm. (and a lot of those pussies can't take a joke :grin: )
 

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During summer break between my years in college... I was to poor bastard that was stuck getting the concrete into odd locations with the biggest fucking wheel barrow the contractors could find... :lol:
 
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