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Discussion Starter #1
I havent been around much, new job isnt going quite as planned and I have to sell off more stuff. :sad:

I was given this rifle by my father, who got it through the DCM around 1988. HRA bolt, SA receiver, barrel and trigger assy. DAS marked stock. WHat kind of value are we looking at?













 

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$600-$1000. Really depends a lot on the bore! Refinished but nice looking.

CMP has run out of Springfields at the present time. Probably wont have any for sale for at least a year also. That has brought on a little panic buying, and now is good time to sell.
 

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Originally built in January 1944.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
TomM said:
$600-$1000. Really depends a lot on the bore! Refinished but nice looking.

CMP has run out of Springfields at the present time. Probably wont have any for sale for at least a year also. That has brought on a little panic buying, and now is good time to sell.
I did the stock with BLO and Chestnut Ridge stain. The metal is as it was delivered by USPS back in the day. I dont have the TE guage required to really grade the bore, but it is bright and shiny.
 

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You need to gauge the bore at both ends as its likely original. I've seen excellent looking bores on Garand's that gauged over 5 at the throat, and 2.5 or better at the muzzle.
Unfortunately, you messed with the stock, and that will hurt the value some. Ballpark figure from the pics would be around $700 if it gauges good. Wood is easy to replace, and the barrel is original, so that's a plus.

Is the rear sight graduated in meters or yards, and will it stay tight? Will the rifle pass the tilt test with the op rod? What is the condition of the op rod lugs, and the piston end?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's just a post war stock, that looked like hell. Did I ruin it?

Not sure on the tilt test. I will tear it apart and take more detailed pics.
 

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On military items anything deviating from "as issued" detracts from the collector value, even if it is a repo stock proper Military finish is plain BLO.
 

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While I don't think you ruined the stock, a purist will see this as messing with it. The tilt test is very important, and in case you don't know, the rifle has to un-lubed for this. If for some reason your op rod is out of spec, its going to decrease the value of your rifle. I know of only one place that can redo an op rod back to spec, and its around $100 or so. An in spec op rod will usually cost $150 and up, more if you want HRA or Winchester.
 

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jasonb said:
It's just a post war stock, that looked like hell. Did I ruin it?

Not sure on the tilt test. I will tear it apart and take more detailed pics.
It looks like a typical CMP/DCM mixmaster, rebuilt/refinished Garand. Stock looks like an H&R. Only remotely valuable fact is it is likely an original barrel/receiver combo. ETA: Looked again, no it's not, barrel is a year newer than the receiver. Rebuild.
It sure wasn't worth more with a beat up stock. A little stain and refinishing hurt nothing.
It pretty much always was, and will be, more valuable as a shooter than a collector. I would look to the last price CMP charged for its Springfield SG's (which are not available currently), and tack on some extra for the 'can't get this from CMP right now' factor.
 

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Look at some of the auction sites to see how the market is, still you have a nice shooter.
 

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My buddies and I got DCM Garands in the early 80's. You were allowed to buy only one under DCM. One M1 rifle from the Army in your lifetime. No choice in anything. You simply got a box with a Garand in it. The only thing you could be sure was it was a rifle that met GI specs as serviceable as they were all rebuilt before being put into storage.

It was a different operation than the CMP does it. I think it's better in some ways now with the choices, but the quality of those DCM Garands was way better than most of what is available to CMP for sale nowdays thirty years later. You had to work for it as the requirement for competition wasn't satified unless you turned in proof that you shot in at least two matches and a bunch of paperwork. It wasn't as simple, nor had the multitude of ways to qualify for it, as it is now. It made that M1 pretty important to you. It was the one you got from Uncle Sam and you had to put out some (very) small effort to qualify for it and you were only getting issued that one. It came US Mail to your doorstep.

They were mostly in the condition you describe your's came in. Mine was a Springfield with a NM oprod. Of the three of us, I got a Springfield that had perfect metal and an excellent stock. My two buddies got H&R's, one had a kinda ratty looking stock, the other was a nice Birch one with a replacement barrel from the 60s. None of them had all matching parts. It's just the way they came. I think most of them got mixed parts when the Army rebuilt them prior to storage. I wouldn't sweat the mixed parts. To me it's "correct" for what it is, a USGI issue rifle.

You did a nice job on the stock. I wouldn't worry about hurting the value too much over it. I'd just shoot it and enjoy it, and remember that it was the one, single Garand your dad could receive from the DCM.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ross said:
My buddies and I got DCM Garands in the early 80's. You were allowed to buy only one under DCM. One M1 rifle from the Army in your lifetime. No choice in anything. You simply got a box with a Garand in it. The only thing you could be sure was it was a rifle that met GI specs as serviceable as they were all rebuilt before put into storage.

It was a different operation than the CMP does it. I think it's better in some ways now with the choices, but the quality of those DCM Garands was way better than most of what is available to CMP for sale nowdays thirty years later. You had to work for it as the requirement for competition wasn't satified unless you turned in proof that you shot in at least two matches and a bunch of paperwork. It wasn't as simple, nor had the multitude of ways to qualify for it, as it is now. It made that M1 pretty important to you. It was the one you got from Uncle Sam and you had to put out some (very) small effort to qualify for it and you were only getting issued that one. It came US Mail to your doorstep.

They were mostly in the condition you describe your's came in. Mine was a Springfield with a NM oprod. Of the three of us, I got a Springfield that had perfect metal and an excellent stock. My two buddies got H&R's, one had a kinda ratty looking stock, the other was a nice Birch one with a replacement barrel from the 60s. None of them had all matching parts. It's just the way they came. I think most of them got mixed parts when the Army rebuilt them prior to storage. I wouldn't sweat the mixed parts. To me it's "correct" for what it is, a USGI issue rifle.

You did a nice job on the stock. I wouldn't worry about hurting the value too much over it. I'd just shoot it and enjoy it, and remember that it was the one, single Garand your dad could receive from the DCM.
My dad had to go to "M1 School" as he called it at Camp Perry. THen wait forever, and pick it up at the post office. Sadly, I have to try and keep my house now, and this will be a causalty.
 

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jasonb said:
Ross said:
My buddies and I got DCM Garands in the early 80's. You were allowed to buy only one under DCM. One M1 rifle from the Army in your lifetime. No choice in anything. You simply got a box with a Garand in it. The only thing you could be sure was it was a rifle that met GI specs as serviceable as they were all rebuilt before put into storage.

It was a different operation than the CMP does it. I think it's better in some ways now with the choices, but the quality of those DCM Garands was way better than most of what is available to CMP for sale nowdays thirty years later. You had to work for it as the requirement for competition wasn't satified unless you turned in proof that you shot in at least two matches and a bunch of paperwork. It wasn't as simple, nor had the multitude of ways to qualify for it, as it is now. It made that M1 pretty important to you. It was the one you got from Uncle Sam and you had to put out some (very) small effort to qualify for it and you were only getting issued that one. It came US Mail to your doorstep.

They were mostly in the condition you describe your's came in. Mine was a Springfield with a NM oprod. Of the three of us, I got a Springfield that had perfect metal and an excellent stock. My two buddies got H&R's, one had a kinda ratty looking stock, the other was a nice Birch one with a replacement barrel from the 60s. None of them had all matching parts. It's just the way they came. I think most of them got mixed parts when the Army rebuilt them prior to storage. I wouldn't sweat the mixed parts. To me it's "correct" for what it is, a USGI issue rifle.

You did a nice job on the stock. I wouldn't worry about hurting the value too much over it. I'd just shoot it and enjoy it, and remember that it was the one, single Garand your dad could receive from the DCM.
My dad had to go to "M1 School" as he called it at Camp Perry. THen wait forever, and pick it up at the post office. Sadly, I have to try and keep my house now, and this will be a causalty.
You have to do what you have to do. In the end, the gun is just an asset and the choice is pretty obvious.

Do you have the DCM paperwork? I dunno if that would help the value or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm sure my dad does. It' gonna kill him when I tell him it's going.
 
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