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This one needed some TLC as the previous owner swapped stocks, but fortunately, he bought both so I was able to put the original RC matched stock on.
I've never seen a real Kreigsmodel late War stock like this on a Russian capture, but its a nice one. I "think" the Russians added the extra cross bolt on the wrist, but its in otherwise good shape. If you look closely at some of the pics you can some typical late War features like rough metal machining, and "chatter" marks on the stock from worn machinery and cutting corners on the final sanding.
The parts that are forced matched on this are:
Bolt, and bolt sleeve
Trigger housing
Stock

While the Waffenamts are totally intact, I was quite shocked to see that all the metal parts have been blued, not painted over. The majority of the ones I have seen had a thin coat of black paint that came off when you cleaned with solvet like Hoppes, or anything else along those lines. The barrel is the 3rd best I've seen on a German Mauser, and hopefully this will be a shooter. I'm trying to talk the owner into selling me this one, so keep your fingers crossed for me. Picture time:

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Thats a nice one Joe, thats something I have neglected, a nice late war K98.
 

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K98's are my soft spots when it comes to firearms. Just the history behind them makes you wonder what they've seen and experienced. If these things could talk...I have 2 as of now, the first one is my safe queen, a all matching, vet bringback 1941 coded "AX", came with original sling and cleaning rod. Small field repair below the barrel band. I'm guessing whoever had it spent a majority of his time on the western front as a lot of the early dated rifles were lost on the Eastern. My second is my shooter, a 1939 vet bringback coded "147" with about half matching numbers. Interesting thing is on the right side of the buttstock the wood has a long sharp triangle repair that's a blonde wood compared to the very dark wood on the rest of the rifle. Guessing it was a shrapnel that hit the stock and hit the bolt safety tab, and back part of the bolt as those two numbers are replaced with the same numbers.
 

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Panzer, its quite possible that your 147 code is a legit rifle that just was overhauled. I'd need to see detailed pics to be sure, but as long as you know that nobody has messed with it, its likely good to go.

Walt, unless I get VERY lucky, I doubt I will ever get my hands on a full blown legit Kreigsmodel, so this one is as close as I can get. In the old days, the late War stuff was poo pooed by most collectors, but now prices on the un-messed with late War stuff has gone from bad to worse, to just stupid. You might run across one at an OGCA show, or from another serious collector, but be prepared to dig deep for that coin!
I'm hoping my buddy will cut me a deal on this, as I'm going over both RC 98s he bought from an Officer we both served with. Luckily, I caught that Jason swapped the stocks before one or the other got sold or traded. My friend is hard negotiator, so it will be interesting to see what he wants.
 

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Sounds good, I'm looking forward to the pics. One thing to look for is an "02" stamp on the barrel ring on the action. You can see this with the stock on, and its an indication the barrel was replaced. Often times the Germans re-stamped the serial number on the barrel to match the receiver, and did another proof firing. If your rifle has a "stick" eagle on the receiver, and a full blown eagle and swastika on the barrel, it was re-barreled at the depot level.
If your bolt is only partially matching, look and see if the firing pin, safety and cocking piece match themselves, and nothing else. I've seen 100% legit examples of this, and there is a good reason for this.
 

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Do those pieces match the bolt, or just themselves? Does the bolt match the receiver, and is the font the same or different? Depending on the year your rifle was produced, it might have been originally stocked with a solid wood stock. These often went bad, or were just rendered unserviceable due to normal wear and tear. If this was the case, they were mostly re-stocked with laminate stocks. I own an example, and one day I'll get off my ass and take a few pics. the only issue with the rifle I have is someone very lightly sanded the stock long ago. Other than that, its pure pre-war craftsmanship at its best.
 

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Receiver, barrel, all of the sight leaf, all of the bottom plates, bolt handle, magazine spring and tab that releases the entire bolt are 8099.
Safety tab, and the price that hooks into are 7661, firing pin forced matched to 7661
rear band 7748
Front H band 6596
 

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That's a nice looking rifle!

Did dou produce these in '44? I'm only familiar with Oberndorf. Also, would I be right to assume that the bands and other KM style parts were added? To find an RC that was a KM action and had the correct KM parts on it would be almost like hitting the lottery. A cool piece, either way.
 

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Receiver, barrel, all of the sight leaf, all of the bottom plates, bolt handle, magazine spring and tab that releases the entire bolt are 8099.
Safety tab, and the price that hooks into are 7661, firing pin forced matched to 7661
rear band 7748
Front H band 6596
Sounds like it could be legit. The importance of the safety, cocking piece, and bolt sleeve is a lot more important than people think. I own a 100% legit forced matched GEW98 that has the same exact parts as yours that match each other, but nothing else. One of the members of my range brought out his un-messed with GEW98a that also had the same bolt parts replaced that match each other, and nothing else. Look closely at the bolt numbers and letter suffix and see if they are the same font as on your receiver. Also check the root of the bolt handle to see if the WaAs are the same as the receiver.

If possible take really good close ups of these parts, and I'll try and help you out, but it does sound like its legit so far.
 

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That's a nice looking rifle!

Did dou produce these in '44? I'm only familiar with Oberndorf. Also, would I be right to assume that the bands and other KM style parts were added? To find an RC that was a KM action and had the correct KM parts on it would be almost like hitting the lottery. A cool piece, either way.
John, dou. produced 98ks from 1942, to 1945. The ones made in 45 are VERY rare, and are usually full blown Kreigmodels. I suspect the example I have was captured intact at a weapons depot, or at the factory at the end of the war. The upper and lower bands are not "correct" and should be stamped, but since this is an RC, anything goes. Many later Kreigsmodel rifles ditched the band spring all together and just used simple wood screws to attach the upper and lower bands. This rifle has a full speed milled front band, and a milled rear band that have been drilled for the wood screws. It seems the Russians just found what fit best, then drilled the holes. The trigger housing and floor plate are "correct" for this rifle as produced by the Germans.
 

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That is a super RC and will be a nice snag if you can get it. When I started collecting 98K's, all I could afford were these later '44 and '45 dated guns, which, as someone observed, no one else wanted. Same thing with the non-98 mausers (G-33/40, G-24t, G-98/40 etc.). Glad I bought what I did when I did but sure wish I'd bought more!
 

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John, dou. produced 98ks from 1942, to 1945. The ones made in 45 are VERY rare, and are usually full blown Kreigmodels. I suspect the example I have was captured intact at a weapons depot, or at the factory at the end of the war. The upper and lower bands are not "correct" and should be stamped, but since this is an RC, anything goes. Many later Kreigsmodel rifles ditched the band spring all together and just used simple wood screws to attach the upper and lower bands. This rifle has a full speed milled front band, and a milled rear band that have been drilled for the wood screws. It seems the Russians just found what fit best, then drilled the holes. The trigger housing and floor plate are "correct" for this rifle as produced by the Germans.
Ah, I see. It was the screws that threw me. I should have looked closer!:eek:
 

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I don't think that's a split, it looks to be an arsenal repair to me on the butt stock. The known serial number range for Saur is 2106 to 9278t with likely everything going to the Heer. Its hard to tell from the pics, but is your stock solid or laminate?
 

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What was the suffix letter, and is the stock numbered internally and/or externally with the serial number on the receiver?
 

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Suffix letter s after the 8099. I looked where the stock numbers usually are around the bump where the stock curves, but don't see anything. There a spot that looks where they might have been but wore off. However I believe it's a replacement stock, as the Heer H and eagle is that of the Wiamar Republic. So I'm guessing it was a Pre-1937 stock, or where they changed the waffenampt style over.
 
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