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ATF can't even get the ATF's regs right...

Weapon Made from a Shotgun



Classification
Weapon Made from a Shotgun
Distinctive Characteristics

Overall length of less than 26 inches or a barrel or barrels of less than 18 inches in length. Both stock and barrel altered.

Rate of Transfer Tax
$200.00

It's an AOW that would transfer on a $5 stamp.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
you don't know that............ Maybe they are running a special on stamps!!! woooohoooooooo get me some. :)
 

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Yeah interesting the items on the list .....the whole street sweeper classification as destructive device still chaps my ass...basically if we don't like it we will make up a rule to kill it off. Not sure how they worked out the closure on registration of them either. Yeah under non-sporting they could close import but if manufactured in country should be able to still build and register and pay the fees just like SBR now or a machinegun (prior to the Hughes amendment)...Anybody know the law they used to shutdown registration after a arbitrary date picked by them.

Or am I mistaken can I still build and register a street sweeper style gun if I pay the fees and taxes??
 

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Yeah interesting the items on the list .....the whole street sweeper classification as destructive device still chaps my ass...basically if we don't like it we will make up a rule to kill it off. Not sure how they worked out the closure on registration of them either. Yeah under non-sporting they could close import but if manufactured in country should be able to still build and register and pay the fees just like SBR now or a machinegun (prior to the Hughes amendment)...Anybody know the law they used to shutdown registration after a arbitrary date picked by them.

Or am I mistaken can I still build and register a street sweeper style gun if I pay the fees and taxes??

It was attached as a rider to the Firearm Owners Protection Act...hell of a sick joke.

From Wikipedia:

As debate for FOPA was in its final stages in the House before moving on to the Senate, Rep. William J. Hughes (D-N.J.) proposed several amendments including House Amendment 777 to H.R. 4332 [4] that would ban a civilian from ownership or transfer rights of any fully automatic weapon which was not registered as of May 19, 1986. The amendment also held that any such weapon manufactured and registered before the May 19 cutoff date could still be legally owned and transferred by civilians. Specifically, FOPA restricts the transfer and possession of machine guns except for “transfers to or by, or possession by or under the authority of, the United States or any department or agency thereof or a State, or a department, agency, or political subdivision thereof." The ATF, as a representative of the United States and with authority from the National Firearms Act, can authorize the transfer of a machine gun to an unlicensed civilian. An unlicensed individual may acquire machine guns, with ATF approval, from its lawful owner residing in the same state as the individual. The transferor must file an ATF application, which must be completed by both parties to the transfer and executed under penalties of perjury, and pay a $200 transfer tax to ATF. The application must include detailed information on the firearm and the parties to the transfer. The transferee must certify on the application that he or she is not disqualified from possessing firearms on grounds specified in law. He or she must submit with the application (1) two photographs taken within the past year; (2) fingerprints; and (3) a copy of any state or local permit or license required to buy, possess, or acquire machine guns. An appropriate (local) law enforcement official must also certify whether he or she has any information indicating that the firearm will be used for other than lawful purposes or that possession would violate state or federal law. Anyone acquiring a machine gun must, as part of the registration process, pass an extensive Federal Bureau of Investigation criminal background investigation. If ATF denies an application, it must refund the tax. Gun owners must keep approved applications as evidence of registration of the firearms and make them available for inspection by ATF officers.[5]




In the morning hours of April 10, 1986, the House held recorded votes on three amendments to FOPA in Record Vote No's 72, 73, and 74. Recorded Vote 72 was on H.AMDT. 776, an amendment to H.AMDT 770 involving the interstate sale of handguns; while Recorded Vote 74 was on H.AMDT 770, involving primarily the easing of interstate sales and the safe passage provision. Recorded Vote 74 was the controversial Hughes Amendment that called for the banning of machine guns. Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.), at the time presiding as Chairman over the proceedings, claimed that the "amendment in the nature of a substitute, as amended, was agreed to." However, after the voice vote on the Hughes Amendment, Rangel ignored a plea to take a recorded vote and moved on to Recorded Vote 74 where the Hughes Amendment failed.[6][7] The bill, H.R. 4332, as a whole passed in Record Vote No: 75 on a motion to recommit. Despite the controversial amendment, the Senate, in S.B. 49, adopted H.R. 4332 as an amendment to the final bill. The bill was subsequently passed and signed on May 19, 1986 by President Ronald Reagan to become Public Law 99-308, the Firearms Owners' Protection Act.
 

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It was attached as a rider to the Firearm Owners Protection Act...hell of a sick joke.

From Wikipedia:

As debate for FOPA was in its final stages in the House before moving on to the Senate, Rep. William J. Hughes (D-N.J.) proposed several amendments including House Amendment 777 to H.R. 4332 [4] that would ban a civilian from ownership or transfer rights of any fully automatic weapon which was not registered as of May 19, 1986. The amendment also held that any such weapon manufactured and registered before the May 19 cutoff date could still be legally owned and transferred by civilians. Specifically, FOPA restricts the transfer and possession of machine guns except for “transfers to or by, or possession by or under the authority of, the United States or any department or agency thereof or a State, or a department, agency, or political subdivision thereof." The ATF, as a representative of the United States and with authority from the National Firearms Act, can authorize the transfer of a machine gun to an unlicensed civilian. An unlicensed individual may acquire machine guns, with ATF approval, from its lawful owner residing in the same state as the individual. The transferor must file an ATF application, which must be completed by both parties to the transfer and executed under penalties of perjury, and pay a $200 transfer tax to ATF. The application must include detailed information on the firearm and the parties to the transfer. The transferee must certify on the application that he or she is not disqualified from possessing firearms on grounds specified in law. He or she must submit with the application (1) two photographs taken within the past year; (2) fingerprints; and (3) a copy of any state or local permit or license required to buy, possess, or acquire machine guns. An appropriate (local) law enforcement official must also certify whether he or she has any information indicating that the firearm will be used for other than lawful purposes or that possession would violate state or federal law. Anyone acquiring a machine gun must, as part of the registration process, pass an extensive Federal Bureau of Investigation criminal background investigation. If ATF denies an application, it must refund the tax. Gun owners must keep approved applications as evidence of registration of the firearms and make them available for inspection by ATF officers.[5]




In the morning hours of April 10, 1986, the House held recorded votes on three amendments to FOPA in Record Vote No's 72, 73, and 74. Recorded Vote 72 was on H.AMDT. 776, an amendment to H.AMDT 770 involving the interstate sale of handguns; while Recorded Vote 74 was on H.AMDT 770, involving primarily the easing of interstate sales and the safe passage provision. Recorded Vote 74 was the controversial Hughes Amendment that called for the banning of machine guns. Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.), at the time presiding as Chairman over the proceedings, claimed that the "amendment in the nature of a substitute, as amended, was agreed to." However, after the voice vote on the Hughes Amendment, Rangel ignored a plea to take a recorded vote and moved on to Recorded Vote 74 where the Hughes Amendment failed.[6][7] The bill, H.R. 4332, as a whole passed in Record Vote No: 75 on a motion to recommit. Despite the controversial amendment, the Senate, in S.B. 49, adopted H.R. 4332 as an amendment to the final bill. The bill was subsequently passed and signed on May 19, 1986 by President Ronald Reagan to become Public Law 99-308, the Firearms Owners' Protection Act.
Yeah I'm familiar with the Huges amendment closing further registration of machineguns but how did they close registration on streetsweeper/striker style shotguns. They are a classed as a destructive device not a machinegun...Huges amendment only closed machineguns or did I miss something??
 

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Yeah I'm familiar with the Huges amendment closing further registration of machineguns but how did they close registration on streetsweeper/striker style shotguns. They are a classed as a destructive device not a machinegun...Huges amendment only closed machineguns or did I miss something??


Yup...SBR...SBS...DD's...Suppressors...AOW's...etc can still be MFG'ed new and sold to civilians (with registration of course)...just no MG's...
 
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