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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This video has quite a few shots of various manufacturing processes at modern day Izhmash. I especially liked the part at about 7 minutes where they show a casting blank of a bolt carrier body, and how it gets CNC machined. The virgin casting is quite a bit larger than I expected.

They also show details of plastics manufacture, barrel parts getting pressed on, aligning canted front sight bases, and how they sight the rifles in after it's all said and done, then mark the FSB window with a special punch.

For me, the video is a little annoying in the fact they start to show something really cool on the assembly line floor, then have to cut away to spend (too much) time test firing a mule rifle under various conditions to demonstrate and promote how reliable the rifle is (Yeah, yeah, we already know a Kalashnikov can operate in sub-zero temperatures, in rainstorms and sandstorms, hehe!).

But anyway, if you wade through some of the fluff it's worth a viewing to see factory operations:




EDIT:



Guys, here's an even better video of factory operations, with about ten minutes of fast-paced glimpses. It took me two hours of starts and stops to capture all the screen shots I wanted to save.


You can of course watch the whole thing (lots of typical info on MTK and AK history here), but the interesting parts start at about 24:00, where the video gets pretty serious about showing each step of building an Kalashnikov at Izhmash. I tried to make a list of all the stuff I was able to recognize, but had some questions maybe you guys can answer? Also, if you see any errors, or missed operations I failed to list here, please post and let me know!

24:50 stamping sheet metal (receiver flats?)
25:00 CNC machining castings (carriers and rear sight bases)
26:10 some lady drilling/pressing something I can't figure out
26;10 installing trigger guts
26:14 laser engraving

26;17 autobots broaching/threading barrels
26:35 feeding the polymer granules hopper to make plastic parts
26:40 installing magazine molds into the plastics injection machine
26:43 knocking out the internal mag mold body from a new mag (in a cool jig, I bet it's 30 years old?)
26:50 assembling mags
26;57 the rifle rack conveyor
27:02 receiver engravings with a cool receiver jig
27:09 inspections
27:19 pressing a barrel
27:30 shotgun engraving
27:34 cool moving shot of the conveyor going through the line to various stations
27:44 checking upper/lower handguard gaps with a special gauge
27:47 installing folding stock pivot pin
27:50 some lady doing another cool drilling/pressing thing (I wish I knew what it was)
27:51 final assembly of AK rifle
27:57 SVD rifle inspections/documentation?

28:00 test fire of SVD (what's that say on the HG's?)

That's about it for the factory stuff, but the whole video has a lot of good footage and info on MTK. The later half also contains a lot of nice shots of the new AK-12, both in static, presentation and shooting environments. They show some of the most advanced versions of this firearm in the video.

Check t out!

 
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Thanks for posting that. I wonder what they were saying about the "Amerikanski" when they kept referring to the Vietnam War footage? I presume it was talking about the 5.56 round in the M-16A1 and how it led to the 5.45x39, but not speaking the language it is hard to tell for sure. Also, I wonder what they were saying to their intended Russian audience about the irony that America would become such a big market for Izhmach's rifles? I figure it was somewhere between "Thank goodness the Americans are buying up as many rifles as we can ship them, to help keep our jobs here in the factory" and "These rifles that have the bent barrels and canted sights; THOSE are the ones we ship to the Americans. The GOOD ones we save for Mother Russia!" ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)

Guys, here's an even better video of factory operations, with about ten minutes of fast-paced glimpses. It took me two hours of starts and stops to capture all the screen shots I wanted to save.


You can of course watch the whole thing (lots of typical info on MTK and AK history here), but the interesting parts start at about 24:00, where the video gets pretty serious about showing each step of building an Kalashnikov at Izhmash. I tried to make a list of all the stuff I was able to recognize, but had some questions maybe you guys can answer? Also, if you see any errors, or missed operations I failed to list here, please post and let me know!

24:50 stamping sheet metal (receiver flats?)
25:00 CNC machining castings (carriers and rear sight bases)
26:10 some lady drilling/pressing something I can't figure out
26;10 installing trigger guts
26:14 laser engraving

26;17 autobots broaching/threading barrels
26:35 feeding the polymer granules hopper to make plastic parts
26:40 installing magazine molds into the plastics injection machine
26:43 knocking out the internal mag mold body from a new mag (in a cool jig, I bet it's 30 years old?)
26:50 assembling mags
26;57 the rifle rack conveyor
27:02 receiver engravings with a cool receiver jig
27:09 inspections
27:19 pressing a barrel
27:30 shotgun engraving
27:34 cool moving shot of the conveyor going through the line to various stations
27:44 checking upper/lower handguard gaps with a special gauge
27:47 installing folding stock pivot pin
27:50 some lady doing another cool drilling/pressing thing (I wish I knew what it was)
27:51 final assembly of AK rifle
27:57 SVD rifle inspections/documentation?

28:00 test fire of SVD (what's that say on the HG's?)

That's about it for the factory stuff, but the whole video has a lot of good footage and info on MTK. The later half also contains a lot of nice shots of the new AK-12, both in static, presentation and shooting environments. They show some of the most advanced versions of this firearm in the video.

Check t out!


 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Did you guys figure out what I was asking about in that second video i posted?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did you guys figure out what I was asking about in that second video i posted?

The links on this website always get screwed up by the software that is overly complicated.

Here it is again in case those above do not work for you.

 

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26:10 and 27:50 is the same lady on the same machine. I could tell it some some sort of drill press on the first part, and when I froze it and enlarged it on 27:10, you can tell the rifle is upside down with the machine going into the pistol grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Good eye! Cool, it must have a screwdriver bit in it?

Yeah, I watched it again, she's indeed installing the grip screw.

Thanks for checking that out for me! I did not notice the way the firearm was in that jig.
 

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24:50 was a CNC machine opening, 24:54 appears to be stamping the mag well dimples into receiver flats, maybe?
26:10 Lady installing a FCG pin, Then cute redhead lady appears to be using a CNC machine to cut out groove for rear sight base leaf spring?
27:50 Appears to be a power screwdriver bit attaching the pistol grip screw while the rifle is upside down in a jig. Notice the grip and the stock in front of it?

Again; another cool video. Thanks for posting that.

ETA: Panzer beat me to it! Good catch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Very cool!

I found this new shot, a little closer up version:

 

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On January 14, the administration of Kalashnikov Concern signed the agreement with the United States and Canada to deliver 200,000 AK rifles to the countries annually.
According to Kalashnikov press secretary Elena Filatova, "on 14 January, in the framework Shot Show 2014, Concern Kalashnikov, which is a part of State Corporation Rosteh, and Russian Weapon Company (RWC) signed an exclusive agreement to supply the products of Izhevsk gunsmiths in the U.S. and Canada. in accordance with the terms of the agreement, RWC acquired an exclusive right to supply Baikal and Izhmash sporting and hunting weapons to the U.S. and Canada. The rifles are produced under the brand name Kalashnikov. The volume of exported weapons will range from 80 to 200 thousand pieces per year.
Kalashnikov signs contract at SHOT 2014 to ship rifles to USA and Canada - English pravda.ru
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
From virgin forging to partially machined to completed barrel trunnion. Neat!

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
24:54 appears to be stamping the mag well dimples into receiver flats, maybe?
Roger that, man, exactly. I can see the magwell dimple nubs now. Two of them. That long orange-colored titty was throwing me off, hehe, guess it's a pressure indicator of some kind?

Check this out. Barrel pin holes drilling fixture:

 

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I wonder if the "new" Kalashnikov-brand TIGR (or "Lyon" or "Ardvarkk" or whatever-the-hell-animal they want to call the Dragunov under the new brand name) "sporting rifles" will be worked into the deal somehow? Maybe they should name it the "Kalashnikov Coelacanth", as it seems to be extinct around here for now?

It does answer one question I was trying to decide on for my AKS-74N project, however. I guess the way to do it would be to parkerize the bare receiver and trunnions separately (the GM barrel I wound up getting was already chrome-lined and parkerized) and then assembling it (at least the riveted parts) first as they have theirs done before painting it with Norrels semi-gloss black. I was originally thinking of trying to paint the receiver and trunnions apart and then assembling it, but it appears that's not how the factory does it, so I would think they know the best way to build one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think that's a very good idea. Yeah, they paint them after assembly, even after they are test fired. that's why there's no paint under the trunnions. I guess you could paint the interior beforehand, if you thought it was necessary in your area due to humidity issues, then do the exterior after assembly? I know I personally always worry about not being able to DIY paint the interior of a fully assembled rifle as well as they do. A lot of that depends on the gun you use, I guess, and how good of an eye you have. I'm just always afraid of FUBAR'ing it by making the exterior paint run after accidentally getting the gun too damn close, just to catch a deep corner on the interior properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I wonder if the "new" Kalashnikov-brand TIGR (or "Lyon" or "Ardvarkk" or whatever-the-hell-animal they want to call the Dragunov under the new brand name) "sporting rifles" will be worked into the deal somehow?
I hope to God they do. I cant for the life of me understand why it's okay to bring in a civy RPK but not a civy Tigr?
 
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