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In what states can I own a AR15 if I never take it out of my home?

What are the laws? What type of AR15 should I buy to be as legal as possible?

Can you run me through the laws governing this weapon? I'm interested in the intuition. I know virtually nothing about rifles? So, I'm looking for a tutorial.

What would one cost me?

Mike
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Every state has some AR15 style rifle that is legal there. Modification may need to be made to the weapon to make it legal in specific states, such as removing the pistol grip, fixed magazine, etc...

Your questions to date on this board have been far far too broad for anybody to give you useful advice. I'm not sure what your situation is that you feel the need to try and get something that is 100% legal everywhere guaranteed, but it is a bad question because outside of a firearms lawyer you're not going to find a decent answer. Try to at least narrow it down to your current place of residence and maybe 1-2 others if you must have a multi-state firearm, and again be specific so people might actually give you helpful advice.


So some general AR15 characteristics.

The part of the weapon that is considered the actual firearm is the Lower Receiver. That part in and of itself is generally going to be legal everywhere. What might make it legal or illegal in a specific state is all of the bits and bobs that attach to it. You will need to specify a specific state for any further information. One other thing that might effect legality would be the Brand name of a specific lower receiver. Some states ban specific Brands of AR15 style receivers, purely for political reasons. The specifics are too vast to summarize without narrowing it down to a specific state or brand you might inquire about.

Technically speaking, AR15 is itself a brand name. Most "AR15" rifles in the US are not actual AR15s. AR15s are a rifle made by either the Armalite company or later by Colt. In the years since this rifle was developed, everybody under the sun has made AR15 knock-offs. Each with their own name. I own one myself, it is an Aeroprecision M4E1. So its not an AR15, but its an "AR15". AR15 has sort of become a generic term.

To circle back. Some states might ban AR15 rifles specifically, and maybe other specific brand names. But other brand names aren't prohibited because they aren't those specific rifles. Despite the fact that the difference between an actual AR15 and whatever other brand you might be looking at is purely down to what numbers and letters are engraved on the side.

If you really want a tutorial. Plenty of videos on there showing how to operate an AR15, how they work, how to take them apart, etc... Find a real life friend who owns one to take you to the range and show you how they work. Have that same friend take you shopping. You'll learn a lot more that way than the internet.

Regarding cost, it depends. You can buy or build your own AR15 for as little as $5-600 or pay many thousands. Their modularity and popularity has made a dazzlingly huge number of options available at all price ranges.

A complete barebones vanilla AR15 will usually be around $600ish, plus or minus a hundred depending on where you are and what specific parts the gun has. You can also buy a stripped receiver and build the rifle completely from scratch, putting all of the parts together yourself. Its about as hard as building a lego set, and if you show around you can potentially save money over buying a complete rifle. Again, there are many videos out there about how to assemble a rifle from a stripped receiver.

And once you have a complete rifle, it is easy to upgrade your parts. Just swap them out. Want to shoot a different caliber bullet? Change the upper receiver to one with a different barrel, get different magazines, and you're ready to rock. Want a quad picatinny rail? Just change the handguard out. Want a different stock? Just pop it off and pop the new one on. etc....

For example, I have two different uppers for my AR. I have one in 5.56. The normal caliber for an AR. But I also have an upper that is chambered in .458 SOCOM. All I have to do is swap the uppers, can be done in about 10 seconds. I don't even actually have to use different magazines, since .458 socom is designed to feed from 5.56 magazines. It just holds 9 rounds instead of 30 in the same magazine. 300 blackout is another popular caliber that can use the same magazines as 5.56, so even more modularity. Just don't load .300 blackout into your AR15 when it has a 5.56 barrel installed!
 

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OP, you might want to consider checking your local laws where you live rather than ask an internet firearms board about what is legal in your area. If you have issues understanding your local laws, contact a lawyer for clarification.
 
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