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Like the title says the jury is still out on this one, and all input is welcomed and incouraged. Last week while crusing GB I came across a trainer tagged as a Hungarian Mosin Nagant Trainer mfg by Lampagyar Budapest (Budapest Lamp Factory). While admittedly it looks little like a Mosin Nagnt at first glance I did notice some similarities, like the hooded front sight, the shape of the rear of the receiver, but the biggest similarity is the bolt. The bolt looks like a scaled down version of a Mosin Nagnt bolt in .22LR. I decided to do a little research on the rifle and found very little except that a forum member ( Dutch Mosin) owns one and that it is always referred to as a Hungarian Mosin Nagant Trainer. I contacted Ted and asked for his input and he said he had never heard of the model but to feel free to post it and he suggested I contact a friend of his from Hungary who has a web site on Hungarian Firearms ( Manowars Hungarian Weapons & History) and is very knowledgeable on Hungarian weapons.
Below is the e-mail I recieved from him.....

Hi Walt,

I am working on a page on these training rifles. I have photos, but not much research done yet.
They were made approx 1950-56. I am not sure about their official purpose though. Their use was definitely not limited to the military.
The Rakosi government in the 1950's were training civilians, students, young "communists" to weapon usage. During the 1956 Hungarian
Revolution this was a popular weapon, so civilian use was banned after 1956.
Still, I remember in the late 60's, early 70's as we were middle and highschoolers, we were taken to target shooting with these rifles once
or twice a year.
I believe most Lampagyar guns in the US were carried by the escaping revolutionaires to Austria when the Russians invaded Hungary.
I believe the earlier guns were marked "Lampagyar Budapest" and the later ones "Lampagyar NV Budapest".
Which one is yours?
I have seen serials up to 22500 so far.
There should be a Rakosi or less likely a Kadar crest after BUDAPEST.
The black forend on yours is unusual. How was it made?

Regards,
Laszlo

I also contacted Alb87 and received the following PM from him
Good morning Walt,
Thanks for writing.
I don't have many informations on these .22 trainers, but surelly are not a Mosin Nagant variation.
As you said have nothing related to oue Mosin, instead maybe of a similar front sight ( but it is different) and the "open type" ( don't know if it's the proper designation) receiver.
It is a .22 rifle that was used as trainer in Hungary.
In contrary Polish wz48 can be considered a Modin Nagant variation, even if the action is completely different ( from the wz31), because it was actually made with the spec to looks like a Mosin Nagant rifle ( Stock, front and rear sight etc..).
The open type receiver of the hungarian trainer was not made specifically to resemble the Mosin receiver.
Many european .22 caliber rifles had this type of receiver, even in the '50s or '60s like many cheap/simple German Anschutz rifles or Austrian Voere rifles like the ones in the following link
Anschutz .22 Single Shot Rifle - Rifles - Collector's Source, Military Collectibles Online
Item:8996669 Voere Germany .22 Bolt Action Rifle For Sale at GunAuction.com

If DDR adopted one of these rifle, would it be called a Mosin Nagant trainer?
I would not because it has nothing to do with Mosin.
Soviet TOZ .22 rifles are not considered MN related firearms, and it's correct but Soviet TOZ were used as trainer..
Lampagyar .22 shuld be considered as the TOZ.. Trainers, but not Mosin Nagant related firearms.

I think the price is good for this rifle. There are not many examples available
I think the front of the foreend has been repaired with a different wood.

My best regards
Alberto

So as you can see the Jury is still out on this rifle so without further delay I present for your consideration my Lampagyar Budapest Trainer 22 LR , possible Mosin Nagant Trainer.

















 

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I had no idea these were made in .22 cal. Is this one import marked?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I had no idea these were made in .22 cal. Is this one import marked?
No it's not import marked Joe, this seems to help support the thought these left Hungary during the revolution after the Russians invaded.
 

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Hello all. I recently acquired one of these myself. Mine does not have any stamp marks other than the Lampagyar Budapest and the serial number. It does not have an "AV" and appears to be a lower serial number; "S-55##" (S and then a dash and 4 digits). The 4 digits on the metal butt plate do not match those on the receiver.

My father was a 16 year old Hungarian freedom fighter. He was living in a orphanage from the age of 6 (1946) to 16 (1956). This was a result of the hyper inflation of the Hungarian money (Pengo). During this time the Soviets taught the students how to shoot. It's likely he would have learned using one of these. I am happy to have it.

During the Revolution of 56 he took a 12 and half mm anti aircraft gun off the top of a Russian Tank and used it against the communists. It was likely a DSHK 12.7mm (50 cal, but longer). I would love to have some of these rounds for my collection. Anyways, I may upload some photos of my Lampagyar after taking them in better lighting later.
 

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Looking forward to the pics.
 

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Hello all. I recently acquired one of these myself. Mine does not have any stamp marks other than the Lampagyar Budapest and the serial number. It does not have an "AV" and appears to be a lower serial number; "S-55##" (S and then a dash and 4 digits). The 4 digits on the metal butt plate do not match those on the receiver.

My father was a 16 year old Hungarian freedom fighter. He was living in a orphanage from the age of 6 (1946) to 16 (1956). This was a result of the hyper inflation of the Hungarian money (Pengo). During this time the Soviets taught the students how to shoot. It's likely he would have learned using one of these. I am happy to have it.

During the Revolution of 56 he took a 12 and half mm anti aircraft gun off the top of a Russian Tank and used it against the communists. It was likely a DSHK 12.7mm (50 cal, but longer). I would love to have some of these rounds for my collection. Anyways, I may upload some photos of my Lampagyar after taking them in better lighting later.


Son of a Hun, Someone on another forum posted a link to some Life Magazine pics from the 56 Hungarian Revolution and on of the pics is of a 15 year old Freedom Fighter with a Lampagyar .22LR trainer like the one I posted above, this validates what Laszlo of "Manowars Hungarian Weapons & History" said about these rifles being used in the uprising.
The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Photos From the Streets of Budapest | LIFE.com




If you get a chance post up some pics of your trainer, I would be very intrested in seeing it.
 

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It's threads like this that make this forum awesome.
 

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I never even heard of this Hungarian trainer rifle. Thanks you for posting this.
 
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