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Yes, I was there, but spent little time on the ground. Back then we were Task Force 160. We inserted some "Naval Personnel" to take out a radio transmission facility. I was 23 years old at the time and the first time I ever was shot at in combat.
 

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I was in Spain at Morón AB with the other half of the 82nd Airborne Division that didn't get to go to Grenada. It was for a major exercise (CRISEX) and I was there with a contingent of A-10s out of the UK.

The Army guys were happy to be there at first, despite having to live on the floor of an old giant hangar (we were "roughing it" in dormitories that hadn't be occupied since the late 1960s, as evident by the murals still painted on the room walls); until everything went down in Grenada and they realized they wouldn't be getting their combat patches.

I remember it most as it was the first time that USAF B-52s were allowed in Spain after a BUFF collided with a KC-135 over Spain in 1966 and radioactive material fell on local farms after two hydrogen bombs exploded, another intact bomb was found and a fourth was lost at sea for several months.

Cheers! M2
 

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Yes, I was there, but spent little time on the ground. Back then we were Task Force 160. We inserted some "Naval Personnel" to take out a radio transmission facility. I was 23 years old at the time and the first time I ever was shot at in combat.
6 or 4?
 

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Team 6, Assault Group 3. No advance training for this insertion and not wise to do it in daylight. Came under fire from the beginning. Naval Personnel killed the radio transmitter, cut cables, etc. and retreated off shore. Once the station was down, Army PSYOPS personnel from Fort Huachuca aboard ship started broadcasting on the same frequency. We tuned it in: Radio Free Grenada.
 

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Actually, Radio Free Grenada was initially replaced by Spice Island Radio. There's a great article on the PSYOP missions during Grenada here: United States PSYOP in Grenada - Operation Urgent Fury

According to that article...

One of the first objectives was the island’s commercial AM transmitter. The Soviet Union had provided it. The control panel of the transmitter gave control functions in Russian. The locals had put labels in English below those controls. The US Navy sent in a Seal Team to quiet the transmitter just prior to the invasion. While the building exterior received a lot of light weapons damage, the transmitter was reasonably unscathed. The Navy cut the feed lines to the antenna to disable the transmitter. The US Navy’s PSYOP 10KW broadcast transmitter aboard ship off the coast of Grenada began broadcasting using a tethered balloon antenna. The 4th PSYOP Group brought in the TRT-22 and after several days of being bounced around from site to site, finally set up near the new airport at Port Salines. It was there several months.
Additionally, USAF EC-130Es CORONET SOLOs from the 193 SOG broadcast PSYOP messages from the air, to include a pre-invasion "warning" broadcast tape to the people of Grenada...

Working with the 4th Group, the Navy’s Reserve Audiovisual Unit (NARU 186) produced a cassette tape of PSYOP messages and music which the Pennsylvania Air National Guard’s 193d Special Operations Group (then CORONET SOLO) broadcast over radio to the Grenadian people concurrent with the landing of U.S. Marines and Army Rangers. The Navy deployed its mobile 10 kilowatt radio station (AN/ULT-3) which, together with CORONET SOLO, provided coverage of the island until the Army’s 50 kilowatt set could be installed
The revised Radio Free Grenada began broadcasts within days of the invasion...
 

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I know there was a team of 9-12 Communications specialists from Fort Huachuca, assigned to the 4th PSYOPS at Fort Bragg for Urgent Fury. Met some of them on the USS Guam. Earlier in '83 I was on detached service working with that unit at Fort Huachuca, flying between Libby AAF and Laguna AAF, Yuma Proving Grounds. They were testing classified radio jamming equipment.
 

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I was in Germany, out on a Flintlock mission, got to listen to it on the radio.
 

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I was almost there.... Sat on green ramp for I can't remember how many hours until we were told not going and stood down... I was in 2/504
 

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My brother was on the first plane to touch down in Grenada. Later, he was on the second plane to land in Iraq.
 
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