AK Rifles banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,616 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I putting a Nikon Buckmasters scope on an DPMS 308 in an Armalite mount. I put a bubble level on the 1913 rail(Flat top) and one on the top of the elevation turret. After doing this, and making sure both are level, it looks like its canted 5 degrees counter clockwise to me. I have always had trouble getting the cross hairs level in scopes without using tools to line it up. Is this an optical illusion? Is it save to assume that the elevation turret is 100% parallel with the cross hairs?



That's literally what it looks like to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
This simple thing gets me too. Yes, I think the assumption is valid. Try getting it so it looks good to you, leave the rings just loose enough to rotate the tube and let someone else take a look. Use a plain light wall or other background. If it is off for them let them adjust so it looks right to them. Then you look through it, if it is off for you have a few beers, tighten the screws and drive on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,616 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
sporter said:
Maybe your eye is out of alignment...

Seriously just get it to where it looks true and level to you.
I don't think that works well because when you make adjustments, they are on the diagonal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Robpiat said:
sporter said:
Maybe your eye is out of alignment...

Seriously just get it to where it looks true and level to you.
I don't think that works well because when you make adjustments, they are on the diagonal.
Yes you are correct. At ranges about 150 yds and less it isn't too big of a deal, but the farther out you try to shoot the worse it gets..

Here is what I suggest doing. Put the gun in a padded vice and place a level on your 1913 or weaver rail. Then get the rifle leveled in the vice. With the scope in the rings just tight enough to turn without too much muscle, look through the scope at an object across the room. Now after finding an object to take reference of go and string up a "vertical string line" or "plumb bob"near said reference point. After the line is up and is still, look through the scope and align the top and bottom vertical cross hair posts with the plumb line.

I use this method when I mount optics for other people. It guarantees a 99.999% perfect alignment. When "free hand" mounting a scope one persons "spot on" is not the same for another. People tend to hold and twist rifles differently in their shoulder "pockets". In their comfortable and settled in position, they may "feel" that they are holding the rifle in the proper manner, but in all reality they are holding it twisted and "off" to one side or another..

Now here is an important note. If you are using "Weaver tip off" type rings take them off, drive to the nearest bridge and throw them off of its mid-way point... These rings that have the top strap that hooks over the rings base with a "lip" and then attach with 2 screws on the opposite side are SHIT. They are NOTORIOUS fro causing reticule/tube cant.. When you tighten the side down that has the 2 screws it "grabs" the scope tube and rotates it. With having no screws on the opposite side to counteract the unidirectional pull, these rings always result in SOME form of canting..

If you are using standard rings, once the cross hairs are in the correct position carefully tighten the screws in a "criss-cross" pattern (sort of like tightening the bolts up on a carburetor or intake/exhaust manifold). Don't go for broke with your tightening right off the bat, just tighten until you feel medium to moderate resistance and move on to the next screw in the tightening pattern. The Idea is to gradually increase the clamping pressure until the rig is properly tightened all of the way around. Remember 99% of the quality rings made, are supposed to have a slight "gap" between the upper and lower halves on each side. Do not try and make the 2 halves meet, you will crush and "ring" your scope tube..

I hope this helps..

Good luck!

--->APB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
Here is what I suggest doing. Put the gun in a padded vice and place a level on your 1913 or weaver rail. Then get the rifle leveled in the vice. With the scope in the rings just tight enough to turn without too much muscle, look through the scope at an object across the room. Now after finding an object to take reference of go and string up a "vertical string line" or "plumb bob"near said reference point. After the line is up and is still, look through the scope and align the top and bottom vertical cross hair posts with the plumb line.
That’s more or less what I do. Usually I’ll just slap a Harris bipod on the gun and shim underneath the feet until everything is level (never assume the bipod is necessarily level - it’s usually off a bit). Then I’ll drop a plumb bob on the other side of the room and use that for a reference. That seems to work pretty well. I probably have as much if not more trouble getting the eye relief where I want it. There’s a world of difference between bringing the stock to your shoulder and looking through the scope, versus looking through it when you’re laying down prone, which is how I take most of my shots if I have the time.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top