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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found an old build manual in Arabic with instructions to make stamping dies as well as the rifle parts themselves. It assumes you have a barrel and you can figure out how to make furniture but everything else is covered. It's designed for no power tools so even the front trunnion is ground by metal file. The instructions for filing out parts double easily as instructions to 3d model the parts.
Screenshot_20210719-115509_Drive.jpg
 

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So that's basically like "buy a chunk of steel, and file off anything that doesn't look like the AKM trunnion in the pictures"? :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So that's basically like "buy a chunk of steel, and file off anything that doesn't look like the AKM trunnion in the pictures"? :p
I guess in that one picture. I'm more so using it since it has step by step instructions to file off material from a block to get parts, and that translates great to step by step 3d modeling instructions. From there I have full access to a CNC workshop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So that's basically like "buy a chunk of steel, and file off anything that doesn't look like the AKM trunnion in the pictures"? :p
The book is around 260 pages of what looks to be awesome instructional images, even without speaking arabic I can understand 99% of what is going on. It almost feels like it's made for somebody with barely any reading skills to make AKs in a cave lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Any chance I can get a pdf or similar of this manual to add to my collection?
Right now I'm more willing to give out a few pages to those that will collaborate in 3d models. But eventually I'm going to attach this with all the models for a full package drop.
 

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I worry that the diagrams appear to have measurements in even millimeters, or half (0.5).

Real world building machinery out of metal usually involves two or three decimal places. You would probably need that level of precision to have an end product that is useful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I worry that the diagrams appear to have measurements in even millimeters, or half (0.5).

Real world building machinery out of metal usually involves two or three decimal places. You would probably need that level of precision to have an end product that is useful.
Lucky for me I have the resources to test out tolerances and remake parts only paying for material, but as far as I knew the parts that mattered most were the front trunnion, lockup, and the barrel. And besides those an Ak does have rather loose tolerances for a firearm.
 

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Any chance you'd be willing to send me a copy of that? I may have some other files that would interest you that are in the same vein.
 

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Lucky for me I have the resources to test out tolerances and remake parts only paying for material, but as far as I knew the parts that mattered most were the front trunnion, lockup, and the barrel. And besides those an Ak does have rather loose tolerances for a firearm.
"loose tolerances" - Very fair and very accurate.

The thing I immediately thought up reading the topic of 3d modeling was people looking for models of driop in replacment parts, like the thread about the 3d model for the Norinco slant cut rear trunion and receiver end cover.
Members Natimatch and Bigbagofdix were discussing this and the most recent comment was that the model was not quite right.

It's a firearm designed so that it can be manufactured with stone age tools. But the ones made on an assembly line, with interchangeable parts, would be a little more precise than .02 inch increments.
You can do that by file to fit gunsmithing rules, but make everything a little big and buy a couple good files.

This would be a really good project as a "tear down a mint condition rifle and document everything exactly so that it can be reproduced perfectly".
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
"loose tolerances" - Very fair and very accurate.

The thing I immediately thought up reading the topic of 3d modeling was people looking for models of driop in replacment parts, like the thread about the 3d model for the Norinco slant cut rear trunion and receiver end cover.
Members Natimatch and Bigbagofdix were discussing this and the most recent comment was that the model was not quite right.

It's a firearm designed so that it can be manufactured with stone age tools. But the ones made on an assembly line, with interchangeable parts, would be a little more precise than .02 inch increments.
You can do that by file to fit gunsmithing rules, but make everything a little big and buy a couple good files.

This would be a really good project as a "tear down a mint condition rifle and document everything exactly so that it can be reproduced perfectly".
More so my interest is bringing my per build cost down. I have free access to a CNC mill and a CNC plasma cutter so cutting trunnions and blanks would be way cheaper for me to do. I am working too on my custom mini CNC mill so that I can make my own trunnions. Only one part missing and that's the models, and since they arent publicly available I'll make them myself.
 

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Same here....those drawings are like art.
 

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For all of you that wanted this:


There are far better blueprints and drawings out there, guys, take this one with some skepticism as I've not verified the dimensions relative to the original Technical Data Package.
 

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For all of you that wanted this:


There are far better blueprints and drawings out there, guys, take this one with some skepticism as I've not verified the dimensions relative to the original Technical Data Package.
Nice! It actually appears to be much more advanced than just hand filing, I believe the first part is a "shop techniques 101" that describes some basic methods for shaping and casting metal. I have only glanced though it so far, but there's drawings for stamping tools, parts dimensions and even a chapter about how to build and use your own barrel rifling setup. I don't think it's entirely complete though. I was hoping to find receiver dimensions (especially the stamping tools), but it appears to be missing.

In any case: There's a lot of interesting info and useful dimensions, so this one will be saved for future use. BTW: I have attached a copy for those who don't have a Scribd account:
 

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