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Who makes the best fire control group drilling jig?

I have a childers yugo receiver. I have been looking at the childers FCG jig as well as the Robert Forbus FCG jig. Does anyone have any experience with them? I would like to hear your comments.

Thanks
 

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recreator, but he has them on backorder for more than few month. last two times i reached out he said he doesn't know when he will have time to make more, since filling current orders that he is swamped with takes priority.
 

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Forbus no longer produces his jig so scratch that off the list. Recreators has been out of stock forever and after todays EO banning 80%ers they probably won't make any more so I think Childers is the one. In fact Childers may stop making them as well so you better order it quick... the gov't doesn't want us to drill our own holes any more.
 

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strictly speaking it's pretty easy to make a template out of piece of 1/8" or 1/4" flat bar with just a pair of calipers and use it for as long as you need to.

granted template takes more care and a tiny bit less easy to use, but if you are into building AKs using transfer punch and a template should be easily do-able and if not then your man-card should be revoked and you shouldn't be building AKs anyways.

i've made my template over ten years ago and have been using for years, before i got myself a mill with DRO. back in those days nobody made/sold drilling jigs, you relied on your skill and ability to measure stuff. But after doing few receivers i decided template would be an easy thing to do. You can even do a paper wrap type template, assuming you can still find those files to print out.
 

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This... I've never used a jig, only measurements published by Forbus (based on original Russian drawings I think). If you're a detail-oriented metal shop guy, man card not withstanding, you should be able to do this without a jig. I've seen so many threads about how far off the holes are after using brand X whatever jig. Besides, jigs are expensive.
 

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This... I've never used a jig, only measurements published by Forbus (based on original Russian drawings I think). If you're a detail-oriented metal shop guy, man card not withstanding, you should be able to do this without a jig. I've seen so many threads about how far off the holes are after using brand X whatever jig. Besides, jigs are expensive.
I have a question that I have asked before and gotten slightly different answers. The axis points are stamped onto the blank. Why use a jig? A caliper could confirm drawing measurements. Thanks.
 

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A jig simply makes it easier for most people. I wanted a Forbus or Recreator jig but none have been available for a long time so I broke out a machinists rule and laid everything out. Once you have your points you can lay a piece of scrap sheet metal that has the appropriate hole in it (5mm or 7mm) over them and scribe a circle around the points. I like to step-drill: start small and increase drill bit size until you are close. The scribed circle only tells you if your drill bits are wandering. In the end you can either use the correct size reamer or do some careful dremel work with a small carbide bit. I've done both and it has never failed me. Note: the X and Y stamps in the receiver are not in there to denote location; they are more for reinforcement of the holes (it's a sheet metal thing). This method saves $ in tooling also.
 

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A jig simply makes it easier for most people. I wanted a Forbus or Recreator jig but none have been available for a long time so I broke out a machinists rule and laid everything out. Once you have your points you can lay a piece of scrap sheet metal that has the appropriate hole in it (5mm or 7mm) over them and scribe a circle around the points. I like to step-drill: start small and increase drill bit size until you are close. The scribed circle only tells you if your drill bits are wandering. In the end you can either use the correct size reamer or do some careful dremel work with a small carbide bit. I've done both and it has never failed me. Note: the X and Y stamps in the receiver are not in there to denote location; they are more for reinforcement of the holes (it's a sheet metal thing). This method saves $ in tooling also.
Excellent advice. Thank you!
 
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