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Yep....AK-47 parts+stamped reciever=Type 56.
 

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I wish the Chinese hadn't gone with "Type 56" for most of their Kalashnikov variants. Confusing as hell. :neutral:
 

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They didn't limit the Type 56 designation to just Kalashnikov variations. Guess what they call their RPD.......
 

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56type said:
They didn't limit the Type 56 designation to just Kalashnikov variations. Guess what they call their RPD.......
...And, their SKS.

The chinese appeared to have designated their weapons originally by what caliber it used...kinda practical in a 3rd world way.

LG :neutral:
 

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Lollygagger said:
56type said:
They didn't limit the Type 56 designation to just Kalashnikov variations. Guess what they call their RPD.......
...And, their SKS.

The chinese appeared to have designated their weapons originally by what caliber it used...kinda practical in a 3rd world way.

LG :neutral:
Then why the type 81? which is 7.62X39mm too.

Maybe someone over here can answer it, but It's a good question.
 

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Before condescendingly calling it the "third-world" way, a little research would have revealed that T56 meant the year these weapons were issued typed by the countries who adapt them. So T56 weapons meant that the weapon was adapted in 1956 as standard issues for the military. Other "third world" countries had started this tradition. Imperial Germany called theor Commission Rifle Gew88 (1898) and Mauser Gew98; Czech called their Mauser VZ24; Japan's T38; Russian's AK47, all had something to do with the year they were type-issued.

Rich history might also be found behind Typexx designation of Chinese adpated Soviet Weapons:

People's Republic of China (PRC) was established in 1949, and the PLA had their weapons from the Japanese and the old government. Although mainly Japanese, American, and German weapons were the majority, PLA had guns manufactured by virtually any country in the world. The desire to standardized the weapon started when they started manufacturing Soviet's PPSh41 SMG, which the Chinese called T1950 SMG, or T50 submachine gun, because it was adapted in China in late 1950.
DP LMG was adapted and called T53 Company Machine Gun.
Next would be PPSh43 SMG, the Chinese T54 SMG.
The same year, TT33 Tokarev pistol = T54 handgun
12.7mm DShK = T54 anti-aircraft machine
DS machine gun = T54 Heavy Machine Gun
Then, 1956,
AK47 = T56 SMG
SKS = T56 Semi-auto rifle
RPD = T56 Squad Machine Gun
Later,
Makarov pistol = T59 Handgun

The first Chinese domestic design of infantry weapons was T63 automatic rifle, then T81, then T95 (small caliber 5.8mm weapon family). T67 intermediate machine gun has replace T54 Heavy machine gun.

There are more, but those are what I recall without looking into the reference
 

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Edit my earlier post regarding the T53 (Mosin Nagant M44), but that one was left out from the list above.
 

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Kind of what I thought too yej. Funny that 1956 found that many weapons under adoption for the Chinese.

I had asked some Chinese over here about the Characters and something odd occured to me, with no ready explanation.

Most of you know it reads "56 Type"; so the word order is reversed.

But the number actually reads five, six; not 56; if it's translated literally.

There is a seperate number for "fifty six" which is not the same as 5, 6. In our counting system, we use 1.2. 3. etc.... and for coming up with the larger numbers, we simply combine 5 and 6 to form the number "56".

Pretty simple, but the Chinese have a different system. It's not 3rd world, just different, requiring a little research (as Yej pointed out).

Back to the thead; So the characters would reveal a translation that sounds literally like this. " five six type" Arcane but true.
 
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