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Discussion Starter #1
Do the mold numbers found on front sight bases and gas blocks on Bulgarian '74's correlate to their dates of manufacture, or did the Bulgarians use the parts at random?

For example, my Bulgy kit was made in 1990 (year code 30) and has a "3" on the FSB and a "5" on the gas block.

If you have a Bulgy '74, go ahead and list your year code and mold numbers on your FSB and gas block for reference.

Thanks!
 

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Mold numbers are just for quality tracking. And are not a guarantee of date traceability.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So mold numbers on parts would be random on various Bulgy AK-74 rifles and kits, no matter their dates?

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XTRM1NATR said:
So mold numbers on parts would be random on various Bulgy AK-74 rifles and kits, no matter their dates?

Thanks!
Mold numbers are like dies. They could have made 3 molds for lets say the front sight base and numbered them 1, 2 & 3. They could have used all three molds or maybe they only used one mold and as it wore out, went on to the next mold. No one really knows. The next step after a part is cast from a mold is the final machining. After that, they could all be intermixed and pulled out as need when the rifle was built. The assembly line worker does not know nor care what the mold number is so long as the final machine part fits and works. First part in a parts bin does not mean first part out on a assembly line.

Once again, mold numbers are just for quality control. If lets say mold #2 FSB's are giving a problem, they know only to inspect or look out for #2 mold number FSB"s. As molds wear out, the number is retired when newer molds are made.

Also, do not confuse a mold number for a revision of the part itself. That may or may not be the case and only tracked by the manufacturer.

Another fly in the ointment is that the Soviets supplied starter parts for early Bulgarian production and may have supplement all through production. These parts may present their own unique mold identifiers to throw things off if you do not know what you are looking at.

So in essence, you can not rely on mold numbers to date rifles. You do not know the sequence in which the mold number was implemented into production. Unless you have detailed arsenal records, you are shooting in the dark.

I hope you do not collect Garand's, because the will give you fits with revision numbered parts if trying to date or make a period correct rifle. :neutral:
 

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Wow, thanks for the explanation. You explained the concept very well. And Garands? No, I wish I collected them. :wink:

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XTRM1NATR said:
Wow, thanks for the explanation. You explained the concept very well. And Garands? No, I wish I collected them. :wink:

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Thanks, I did my best trying not to over complicate the answer.

I work as an engineer in Aerospace Manufacturing and deal with like issue on a daily basis.

Regards,

Hootbro
 

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p

What iv'e heard is the part numbers should match the barrle number .This makes it easier for people building the guns.Example # 1 barrel, #1 gas block #1 fsb, supposibly matches the barrle diameters.This way they don't have to think to hard.They just grab the corresponding # parts. It sounded logical when i heard it.
 

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It should be a 1991 year (31 code) AK 74.

I always understood the codes as posted above.
The numbers would corespond to like numbered
components that fit together.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
surf99 said:
It should be a 1991 year (31 code) AK 74.

I always understood the codes as posted above.
The numbers would corespond to like numbered
components that fit together.
Oops, I meant year code "30", not "31". Edited original post.

Thanks!
 
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