AK Rifles banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought a windage-adjustable standard Soviet military RPK rear leaf sight assembly from Sashagarner, and it looks awesome and I'm very happy with the seller. Five stars! However, as luck would have it, I now need to find somebody that also bought one from him that can trade with me. Let me explain.

He actually had both Soviet styles, and I just happen to get the one numbered the opposite from what was shown on his website image. I did not know he had two styles, so I did not make a preference and now he's sold out. My kit is a 1976-dated Soviet RPK so I need a leaf with the range numbers '1", "3", "5", "7", and "9" on the left and the range numbers "2", "4", "6", "8" on the right. The one I bought is mint new in the grease and looks great, and will work on any RPK rifle, but I need the other one. I am hoping I can trade for the exact one for my kit.

Mine has the red highlighted numbers, as they all did, but the "1" is located on the RIGHT hand side of the leaf. What I need also has red numbers, but the "1" is located on the LEFT hand side of the leaf, not the right.

Anyway, I know somebody here, some kind-hearted loving friend, has the exact one that I need, and does not care about the number formatting as much ias I do, so lets make a trade! help me get my rare kit back into orignal form!

I will send you my unit as a direct replacement, plus pay shippign and any fee you might want to charge me. .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Like I mentioned, he's out of stock now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Tantal, can you please enlighten us on the year ranges for the different RPK leafs? I have seen the 1 on the left, the 1 on the right, red numbers, and white numbers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Tantal, can you please enlighten us on the year ranges for the different RPK leafs? I have seen the 1 on the left, the 1 on the right, red numbers, and white numbers.
I could tell you. but then I'd have to...just kidding! I'll go ahead and share with you the rundown on numbering formats. if you know the color of the highlights and the numbering format, then you can determine the era of the sight leaf assembly, and what firearm it was orginally made for. There are also other small variations (such as font changes), but you don't treally have to know those to get a pretty close estimate of when the sight was made. However, please keep in mind that all of these are TOTALLY interchangeable and it's the ramp on the rear sight base of the firearm that determines bullet drop compensation.

Odd numbers on the LEFT in WHITE highlights is 1960's RPK-47.

Odd numbers on the LEFT in RED highlights is 1970's era RPK-47, and late 70's-early 80's RPK-74.

Odd numbers on the RIGHT in RED highlights is mid- to late '80's RPK-74.

Odd number son the RIGHT with WHITE highlights is early 1990's RPK-74, as well as RPK-74M (all).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Okay, I found a trade partner for my sight leaf assembly, so all is well! Thanks, Derek!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Glad it was of some interest!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
So, Tantal, I have a related question...why are some of the RPK sight leaves marked with numbers on the bottom side?
I know this question was directed at Tantal but I think it's so the soldier can momentarily lift the rear sight up with his fingers and see the current setting while still in a firing position, without having to raise his head up far enough to see the setting from the top and changing his silhouette enough to attract unwanted attention on a two-way range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Tantal, PLEASE post photos of your RPK kit!!!!!
I wish it was an all numbers matching intact kit, but it's not. I'm having to piece a lot of it together. I'll try to take and post some images anyway, if you still want to see it.

I know this question was directed at Tantal but I think it's so the soldier can momentarily lift the rear sight up with his fingers and see the current setting while still in a firing position, without having to raise his head up far enough to see the setting from the top and changing his silhouette enough to attract unwanted attention on a two-way range.
That's certainly right. It's a very long barrel and fairly heavy rifle, and by design is often used for point defense in more or less static positions. It;s not easy to adjust the sights on the fly when you are employing the bipod, set up behind an obstruction, or in a ditch with the rifle supported on top of a wall, or in any kind of prone shooting position where the rifle is more or less situated completely ahead of your body.

All RPK's should have sights with range index numbers on the top and the bottom. The numbers on the bottom exactly correspond to those on the top (unlike a PBS sight). This allows you to stay protected behind the rifle, ready to fire, with your hand on the pistol grip and shoulder on the stock, while using your off hand to adjust the sight. All without dangerously risking raising your body, or having to disturb your aim and/or completely removing the rifle from it's designated position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,370 Posts
I wish it was an all numbers matching intact kit, but it's not. I'm having to piece a lot of it together. I'll try to take and post some images anyway, if you still want to see it.


That's certainly right. It's a very long barrel and fairly heavy rifle, and by design is often used for point defense in more or less static positions. It;s not easy to adjust the sights on the fly when you are employing the bipod, set up behind an obstruction, or in a ditch with the rifle supported on top of a wall, or in any kind of prone shooting position where the rifle is more or less situated completely ahead of your body.

All RPK's should have sights with range index numbers on the top and the bottom. The numbers on the bottom exactly correspond to those on the top (unlike a PBS sight). This allows you to stay protected behind the rifle, ready to fire, with your hand on the pistol grip and shoulder on the stock, while using your off hand to adjust the sight. All without dangerously risking raising your body, or having to disturb your aim and/or completely removing the rifle from it's designated position.

Yes, please!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top