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Also, what were the differences between the AKM-63 (first model) and the Soviet original?
Basically no difference at all, just had a Hungarian serial number.

I had some errors in my previous list sorry, here it's the updated one.

AKM-63 - Original AKM style. The first 300 pcs had a plywood pistol grip, lower and upper handguard, than between 301 - 15023 pcs has steamed beech wood grip and lower and upper handguard. Looks like the later AK-63F AMM types.

From the upcoming book:
"The technical parameters of the new AKM-63 weapon were equivalent to the original Soviet model. Instead of the AK-55 one-piece milled receiver, the AKM-63 receiver made from sheet metal. The 300 pcs initial batch of AKM-63 made in 1963, were used plywood to create a pistol grip and a lower and upper handguard. However, it soon became obvious that the lightweight plywood parts could not be produced in sufficient quality by the Hungarian wood industry. Therefore, starting from the 301st piece, these plywood parts were changed to steamed beech wood. Because of this, however, the weight of the submachine gun increased, which was not acceptable by the HM. Due to weight reduction requirements, the heavy lower, upper handguard, and the pistol grip had to be changed to something else. Primarily the lower handguard was made of sheet metal, on which the forward-facing wooden pistol grip was placed. The upper handguard wood part removed so the gas tube was left bare metal. Finally, the regular AKM compensator on the barrel end was also removed. Unfortunately, it turned out that replacing the wood lower handguard with a metal sheet handguard with a wooden pistol grip due to the heavier solid wood did not significantly reduce the weight of the submachine gun. But since the lower handguard equipped with the pistol grip was not in direct contact with the barrel, it was possible to make the front and rear grips and the buttstock from plastic. All they had to do was find the right plastic, which is cheaper than wood, but just as durable."

From my collection: This weapon started his life as a training weapon "GYAK", that is the reason why it got plywood furniture which did not changed to plastic.
BIG_0015489414.jpg BIG_0015489415.jpg BIG_0015489416.jpg BIG_0015489417.jpg BIG_0015489418.jpg BIG_0015489419.jpg BIG_0015489420.jpg BIG_0015489421.jpg BIG_0015489422.jpg BIG_0015489424.jpg
 

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Basically no difference at all, just had a Hungarian serial number.

I had some errors in my previous list sorry, here it's the updated one.

AKM-63 - Original AKM style. The first 300 pcs had a plywood pistol grip, lower and upper handguard, than between 301 - 15023 pcs has steamed beech wood grip and lower and upper handguard. Looks like the later AK-63F AMM types.

All details already in my AMD-65/AMP book. (It's available only in the Hungarian language). AMD-65 Automata Módosított Deszantfegyver / AMP Automata Módosított Puskagránátlövő

But I work on the English language version, which will available soon. Publishing depends on when I find a native English proofreader who has the eligible technical background to able to check the book.

From the upcoming book:
"The technical parameters of the new AKM-63 weapon were equivalent to the original Soviet model. Instead of the AK-55 one-piece milled receiver, the AKM-63 receiver made from sheet metal. The 300 pcs initial batch of AKM-63 made in 1963, were used plywood to create a pistol grip and a lower and upper handguard. However, it soon became obvious that the lightweight plywood parts could not be produced in sufficient quality by the Hungarian wood industry. Therefore, starting from the 301st piece, these plywood parts were changed to steamed beech wood. Because of this, however, the weight of the submachine gun increased, which was not acceptable by the HM. Due to weight reduction requirements, the heavy lower, upper handguard, and the pistol grip had to be changed to something else. Primarily the lower handguard was made of sheet metal, on which the forward-facing wooden pistol grip was placed. The upper handguard wood part removed so the gas tube was left bare metal. Finally, the regular AKM compensator on the barrel end was also removed. Unfortunately, it turned out that replacing the wood lower handguard with a metal sheet handguard with a wooden pistol grip due to the heavier solid wood did not significantly reduce the weight of the submachine gun. But since the lower handguard equipped with the pistol grip was not in direct contact with the barrel, it was possible to make the front and rear grips and the buttstock from plastic. All they had to do was find the right plastic, which is cheaper than wood, but just as durable."

From my collection: This weapon started his life as a training weapon "GYAK", that is the reason why it got plywood furniture which did not changed to plastic.
View attachment 312670 View attachment 312671 View attachment 312672 View attachment 312673 View attachment 312674 View attachment 312675 View attachment 312676 View attachment 312677 View attachment 312678 View attachment 312679
All original parts? Did it have the lightening cut on the bolt carrier?
 

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Well, I have doubts if any AK-63 exported before 1980. This is because based on the FÉG official records about AK-63F (AMM), the factory restarted production of the old AKM-63 with new wood furniture and created the first batch of AK-63F in August 1976 for military acceptance test. Due to bureaucracy, the first AK-63F serial batch started to produce only in November 1979. The AK-63D (AMMSz) started to produce a bit later only in April 1980.

This AK-63 could not be mixed with the older AKM-63 MAT (Műanyag Tusás) equipped with plastic grips and stock. Those guns were refurbished and their plastic parts changed to wooden ones as well as their bare metal gas tube changed to a wooden one. This called AKM-63 FAT (Fa Tusás). This was exported to various countries such as Iraq, Iran, Syria, Egypt, and so on. Gun serials tell the truth.

AK-63 serials pool: GA XXXX - HH XXXX
AKM-63 serials pool: MA XXXX - ML XXXX (with a few exceptions: AKM-63I with infra mount have EA XXXX - EB XXXX serials)
SA-85/SA-85M serials pool: SM XXXXX - SN XXXXX

This picture is from 1980 FÉG's monthly newspaper: "For the celebration of the liberation of Hungary, on April 4, the first series of new submachine guns were produced."
View attachment 312317

This Iranian Soldier from November 1982 had refurbished AKM-63 which can be distinguished by the lack of slant muzzle brake.
View attachment 312318

For reference: Refurbished AKM-63's keep their old-style handguard retainer which has an extra hole at their side.
Yes, it has different hand guarder retainers. But around the mid-'90s when FÉG was in a difficult situation they often used their old AKM-63 parts from their stock for their AK-63.

Even Hungarian soldiers were often unaware of the type of weapon they were using. Refurbished AKM-63 I FAT (with a rail for the old NSP-2 Infrared device) used as AK-63F (AMM)

View attachment 312335

AKM-63 retainer
View attachment 312333

AK-63 retainer
View attachment 312334
View attachment 312319
What was the purpose of the extra hole in the retainer?
 

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Was it found on the first model as well?
Nope. The first model had no extra holes at the front and the side of the retainer. The next models had holes at both locations.

Top: Initial version made for plywood version. Had thicker material and no front hole on the retainer.
Middle: Transitional version, had thinner material with a front hole on the retainer.
Bottom: Regular version, had thinner material with front and side holes on the retainer.

312685
 

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Why it has a hole for plastic stock?
Do you mean the hole at the receiver bottom side behind the grip? I have no idea, could be a transitional receiver. This hole was even on some AMD-65 receiver and their buttstock rear trunnion bottom.

AMD-65 rear trunnion with an AKM-63 style hole.

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A lot of new knowledge being dropped in this thread
 
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Basically no difference at all, just had a Hungarian serial number.

I had some errors in my previous list sorry, here it's the updated one.

AKM-63 - Original AKM style. The first 300 pcs had a plywood pistol grip, lower and upper handguard, than between 301 - 15023 pcs has steamed beech wood grip and lower and upper handguard. Looks like the later AK-63F AMM types.

All details already in my AMD-65/AMP book. (It's available only in the Hungarian language). AMD-65 Automata Módosított Deszantfegyver / AMP Automata Módosított Puskagránátlövő

But I work on the English language version, which will available soon. Publishing depends on when I find a native English proofreader who has the eligible technical background to able to check the book.

From the upcoming book:
"The technical parameters of the new AKM-63 weapon were equivalent to the original Soviet model. Instead of the AK-55 one-piece milled receiver, the AKM-63 receiver made from sheet metal. The 300 pcs initial batch of AKM-63 made in 1963, were used plywood to create a pistol grip and a lower and upper handguard. However, it soon became obvious that the lightweight plywood parts could not be produced in sufficient quality by the Hungarian wood industry. Therefore, starting from the 301st piece, these plywood parts were changed to steamed beech wood. Because of this, however, the weight of the submachine gun increased, which was not acceptable by the HM. Due to weight reduction requirements, the heavy lower, upper handguard, and the pistol grip had to be changed to something else. Primarily the lower handguard was made of sheet metal, on which the forward-facing wooden pistol grip was placed. The upper handguard wood part removed so the gas tube was left bare metal. Finally, the regular AKM compensator on the barrel end was also removed. Unfortunately, it turned out that replacing the wood lower handguard with a metal sheet handguard with a wooden pistol grip due to the heavier solid wood did not significantly reduce the weight of the submachine gun. But since the lower handguard equipped with the pistol grip was not in direct contact with the barrel, it was possible to make the front and rear grips and the buttstock from plastic. All they had to do was find the right plastic, which is cheaper than wood, but just as durable."

From my collection: This weapon started his life as a training weapon "GYAK", that is the reason why it got plywood furniture which did not changed to plastic.
View attachment 312670 View attachment 312671 View attachment 312672 View attachment 312673 View attachment 312674 View attachment 312675 View attachment 312676 View attachment 312677 View attachment 312678 View attachment 312679
I noticed that is has the vented AK-47 gas tube. Was that standard on the first model? Did it's lower hand guard have swells, or was it smooth? Finally, was the bolt fluted?
 

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I noticed that is has the vented AK-47 gas tube. Was that standard on the first model? Did it's lower hand guard have swells, or was it smooth? Finally, was the bolt fluted?
Yes as far as I know all early plywood models had a vented gas tube. Their lower handguard was smooth. Its bolt was fluted.
3c5b_1_big.jpg 3c5b_2_big.jpg 3c5b_7_big.jpg
 

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So they no longer had the vented gas tubes when they went over to the metal hand guard and bare gas tube? Did they change to unfitted bolts as well?
Sorry, meanwhile I found a reference in the AKM-63 gunsmith manual about the early AKM handguards and gas tubes. It seems could have at least theoretically a swelled lower handguard. At least based on the manual. I never saw any even in the FÉG or in the Military History Museum. But this could mean nothing because I have an AMP-68M (an early version of AMP with a custom gas block, front sling swivel, and had a different "Z" letter placement) which you could not find in any museum as well. So everything is possible.
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AKM-63 handguards:
AKM-63_001.jpg

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The manual showed how the plywood buttstock and handguards could be repaired:
AKM-63_003.jpg


Also as far as I know all Hungarian made AK bolts even the oldest AK-55 (AK-47) was a fluted bolt.
 

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So they no longer had the vented gas tubes when they went over to the metal hand guard and bare gas tube? Did they change to unfitted bolts as well?
Sorry forgot the answer your question meanwhile. :)

Yes, AKM-63 vented gas tubes were gone when metal handguards introduced. I don't think they changed its bolts. The most expensive part of the weapon was the barrel, bolt carrier, and bolt. So very unlikely they changed it.
 

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The manual showed how the plywood buttstock and handguards could be repaired
Drawings in manual came directly from russian manual with mininal changes, the same with german manuals - you can see some soviet parts that were realy modified in GDR.
 

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Drawings in manual came directly from russian manual with mininal changes, the same with german manuals - you can see some soviet parts that were realy modified in GDR.
Yes, that's true, because Hungary bought specimen Soviet AKMs and all drawings and documentation of their modernized AKM’s in 1963. But Hungarian manuals always customized and represent the real model drawings and did not follow fully the Soviet original documents only in a very rare case. If you compare the Soviet and Hungarian manuals you could see many of their part drawings are not identical.
 

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Yes, that's true, because Hungary bought specimen Soviet AKMs and all drawings and documentation of their modernized AKM’s in 1963. But Hungarian manuals always customized and represent the real model drawings and did not follow fully the Soviet original documents only in a very rare case. If you compare the Soviet and Hungarian manuals you could see many of their part drawings are not identical.
Could you maybe give a few examples?
 

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As far as I know, the AKM-63 internals follows the Soviet drawings fully, but many external small parts redesigned or even simplified. Also, FÉG produced those parts not only for AKM-63, but AMD-65, AMP-69, AK-63, SA-85, and because those production lines are working parallel at the same time, they often have mixed part due to a lack of quality check.

And yes HU Army used both types under a common AK-63F/AMM name. But the two type of weapons is not identical.
I was wondering what external small parts you mean.
 

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I was wondering what external small parts you mean.
I mean simplified its manufacturing. Most AKM-63 screws, internal parts, springs, front sights, firing pins, and even rivets different than the original Soviet-made. So if you put those parts next to each other you could see which was manufactured in Hungary and which in CCCP. It is hard to explain. I have many former FÉG workers and engineer contact who told me a lot of details about most Hungarian parts manufacturing.
 
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