AK Rifles banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a cool video with lots of vintage Afghan War era footage, taken on the rifle range..

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
At 1:46 that training aid sight is awesome. I know it is useless put i think it would be cool to add to the collection. Nice vid Tantal I just wish I could speek russian.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,889 Posts
I've never seen that before, that was really great. That video of the RPK-74...... :animak:

Any guess approximately what year the black and white footage is from?

At 1:46 that training aid sight is awesome. I know it is useless put i think it would be cool to add to the collection. Nice vid Tantal I just wish I could speek russian.
Amen to that. I clicked the CC button and set the captions to English which helped atleast give an idea of what they are talking about (but is far from perfect).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,434 Posts
The East German ZGK-65 squad marksmanship training kits on the market have 10 or 12 of those mirrored coaching sights.

Slightly different design, but same concept. Magnet holds it on the receiver cover and coach can observe the trainee's sight picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One of my favorite parts of this video is the background music.

Any guess approximately what year the black and white footage is from?
I'd guess 1987-88? Not sure.

Interesting. I found it strange though they actually train them to take their firing hand off the grip and trigger. Guess that's more fman American military thing.
Like most of it's predecessors, and even contemporaries, the AK was designed specifically with right hand operation of cocking handle, selector lever and even magazine changes in mind. Due to leverage, it's just easier and more naturally comfortable to keep a heavy, extended rifle with a short buttstock aimed downrange under safe control with the off hand left on the forearm. Keeping the firing hand on the trigger and using the other hand to control the operations of the firearm is best accomplished on a firearm designed from the onset to facilitate such a procedure. I think that's one of the benefits of the new AK-12 design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
Interesting video; thank you for sharing that. I noticed they were showing the sight picture as aiming for the belt buckle on the target. I wonder what the distance was on the range they were shooting at?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,426 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Since the standard 400-meter zero of an AK-74 rifle places the groupings above where the rifle is actually being aimed, students like those we see in the video are trained to aim at about waist-height or midpoint which is meant to produce center mass hits at targets out to the distance of the zero, without having to adjust the sights during a firefight. This is the purpose of the battlesight setting, of course.

I believe this type of training would be done on the standard range, specified at 100 meters, i.e. the same range used to zero the rifles. The basic marksmanship training we see in this video is meant to reinforce how one would aim in a combat situation conduced on a rifle that has already been zeroed, normally by a skilled unit marksman (or range instructor). Basic trainees are not allowed to zero the rifles themselves.

Soviet military zero instructions specify that the rifle is to be zeroed to 300 (7,62) or 400 (5,45) meters, using the "battlesight" rear leaf setting. This is to be accomplished on a standard 100-meter range. The shooter aims at the center of the target, but the sights are adjusted so the shot groups are printing above the aiming marker by a specific measured distance depending on the caliber of the rifle.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top