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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have to star replacing some rotten wood windows in my 15 year old house with new vinyl windows.

I have a brick front house and that is where most of the windows are. They have two different types of windows. Replacement and New construction. I want to do it right. Can the new construction be used if I remove all the old frame?
 

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The cheap vinyl replacement windows you see advertised are designed to be installed into the old frame after the guts have been removed. New construction type windows are designed to have the old window removed, frame and all.

The first kind are cheaper and faster to install, but if your old windows are rotted to the frame you're just pissing in the wind by installing them. They also are generally inferior windows in terms of quality, and you can't do anything more in terms of insulation around them like you could if you installed a completely new window.

The second kind will be more expensive, take longer to install, but will be a most likely be a more durable window with higher quality hardware and construction. And since you're removing the old frame, you have the opportunity to carefully insulate the window around the frame as you reinstall. Combine that with energy efficient windows and you will have a very energy efficient house when done.

I've been working as a remodeler for the past 8 years. I've installed plenty of both kinds. If you have any other questions, ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How do I go about getting an accurate measurement so I can shop around? I have 4 typical sliding windows and 3 picture windows that are 6'x6' or so. I would prefer to do it right, but can't afford to pay someone to do anything since I met all you assholes. :lol:
 

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Yep, generally they will have a salesman come out and do the measuring. They don't want to get stuck with the bill if the homeowner makes a mistake and they order thousands of dollars of incorrectly sized windows.
 

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Brick house. Older brick house with double hung wood frame windows with frame set into the brick? If so, you can't remove the frame really. You take out the panes and the stops except one (either the outside or inside, depending on how you want to do it) so that all you are left with is the wood frame, then install a replacement window in the frame that measures 1/2" less on the length and width than the opening. Then insulate around the edges (Great Stuff-don't over do it) and put in a new outer or inner stop, whichever you need. Well, that's simplifying things a bit, but that's pretty much it.

Now, on the windows themselves, you can basically turn a new construction window into a replacement window by cutting off the nailer fin. With vinyl or aluminum, you can score at the base of the fin with a good utility knife, then bend it back and forth, and eventually snap it off. Easier with vinyl, of course. With a replacement window, you screw sideways through the jamb and into the wood frame. Cheap gold screws do the trick.

I really have no idea how you would install a new construction window with the nailer fin intact on a brick house. I have an adobe house, and I used new construction windows sans fin to replace all 12 of my windows. I could do 6 in a weekend, including repainting. Not too hard, assuming your frames are square.
 

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Like everything, they change dimension standards over the years.

Get something good and you will never look back.

KyAKGuy
 
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