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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I am, for the third time, trying to press on my gas block. Last two times it was a smidge off and I hated it. So I am asking for tips on how best to align my gas block properly. It's a Yugo. In the past I messed up because the grenade launcher sight is slightly off and I aligned it to that.

Any help much appreciated!
 

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FWIW align the flats like you'd level a chair on a flat surface. Works with almost anything with sites that have flat spots on them. Flip the barreled action upside down and on a flat surface use 1-2-3 blocks or something flat and square if needed to isolate the two surfaces you want level. For AK actions I align the rear sight to the top back of the receiver, then the front sight to the receiver. Rock the parts back and forth. If you feel two crisp points of contact then you're done. 3-4 points of contact or two mushy contact points and it's off. When you have it done, swap it end for end and retest as your surface might not be flat. Our kitchen counter is flat enough to use, but I generally use the bed on my 9x49 mill as it's easier to feel the contact points. If the front sight ears are bent stick a rod through the lightening hole and support it evenly on both ends. I've got a mauser I'm about to solder the sight on and will put some pics up later of what I'm talking about. Used this alignment style on Ak's, Ar's, M1's, mausers, M1carbines, FAL's and other actions and it's cheap, easy and works.
 

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i use a read thread that i stretch from rear trunnion over rear sight leaf notch all the way to tip of the barrel. then align on that. pretty much by eye.

i used laser too, but thread seems more precise and easier to work with and setup, plus batteries on those lasers seem to be always dead when i need to use it.

also used digital level but eventually found that some of the flat areas i used for reference weren't square so that didn't guaranty proper alignment.
 

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Here's what I'm talking about. You can go off the flat bottom or top of the receiver, then a flat spot on the gas block, like the bayonet lug or the flat space right behind it. You can also use a square and catch the large flats that make up the sides of the gas block on a M70. Basically though you want to end up with two points of contact (red arrows) where you can rock the assembly back and forth to feel two crisp corners. If it's way off you'll feel 3-4 corners or just a little the corners will seem mushy. If one surface is beat up, use a different one as there are usually multiple. The last 3 pics are the mauser I'm rebarreling at the moment. The sights are soldered on and must be aligned first. The receiver bottom is flat so that is what everything is set to. The rear sight ears were beat up, but the area behind it wasn't so that was used to level the front sight.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's what I'm talking about. You can go off the flat bottom or top of the receiver, then a flat spot on the gas block, like the bayonet lug or the flat space right behind it. You can also use a square and catch the large flats that make up the sides of the gas block on a M70. Basically though you want to end up with two points of contact (red arrows) where you can rock the assembly back and forth to feel two crisp corners. If it's way off you'll feel 3-4 corners or just a little the corners will seem mushy. If one surface is beat up, use a different one as there are usually multiple. The last 3 pics are the mauser I'm rebarreling at the moment. The sights are soldered on and must be aligned first. The receiver bottom is flat so that is what everything is set to. The rear sight ears were beat up, but the area behind it wasn't so that was used to level the front sight.

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Thanks man!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here's what I'm talking about. You can go off the flat bottom or top of the receiver, then a flat spot on the gas block, like the bayonet lug or the flat space right behind it. You can also use a square and catch the large flats that make up the sides of the gas block on a M70. Basically though you want to end up with two points of contact (red arrows) where you can rock the assembly back and forth to feel two crisp corners. If it's way off you'll feel 3-4 corners or just a little the corners will seem mushy. If one surface is beat up, use a different one as there are usually multiple. The last 3 pics are the mauser I'm rebarreling at the moment. The sights are soldered on and must be aligned first. The receiver bottom is flat so that is what everything is set to. The rear sight ears were beat up, but the area behind it wasn't so that was used to level the front sight.

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Also, nice mill table. Wish I could afford one.
 

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Also, nice mill table. Wish I could afford one.
Thanks, got it as a basket case for $800 as it had a loud knock. Turns out the moveable spindle hub pulley half sleeve had worn out and the prior owner had just kept using it which beat up the key and keyway slot. It was an easy temporary fix to spin the hub 180 degrees, cut a new keyway, replace the key then bore out and put a new oversized sleeve in the pulley half. I got a new hub and pulley half for when it starts making noise again, but so far those parts have been sitting on my desk for the past 4 years.
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Hopefully the gasblock & sight alignment method works for you. I've been using it for a little over 30 years now and it is my go to method.

Got the Mauser sights pictured above soldered on and will rust blue it when I have time. Hope to shoot it this weekend.
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I always install trunnion to barrel, rear sight to trunnion, install gas block and align gas block to carrier/piston. I do this prior to riveting trunnion to the receiver. Not eveyone likes this method, it works for me. I like to populate the barrel prior to installing it into the trunnion. My 2 cents, that's all.
 

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I like to stack components. One and done.

I rivet the trunnion, install and pin the barrel (or toque it if it's a screw in milled). Then press on the RSB with the rear sight leaf installed, making sure it is not canted with my MK-1 eyeball, very little room between the ears makes this hard to mess this up.

For the GB I again use my eyeball, this time I look at it from multiple angles and use a flat surface to be sure. Then I drill and pin it.

Next, I center the front sight post and press it on again making sure it is not canted by my eye. Having to push the front sight drum off center to zero really bugs me so I never drill and pin untill I test fire and rough zero the rifle. I mark the FSB and barrel at 3 and 9 o'clock with a sharpie, test fire and do gross adjustments with a rubber mallet to center everything to point of aim, then I mark the centerline with a sharpie for good measure and future reference. When I come home from the range I drill and pin the FSB.

Your eye is a great tool. I'm getting old, I check with my reading glasses on and off. I've never had to adjust any of my FSBs more than a few degrees. More often than not I spend more time than needed to get it perfect.

I've tired various laser levels and sometimes use an old B&D laser level but nothing works as well and as fast as flat surfaces, your eyes and taking the time to get how you want it.

So many ways to skin this Kalash, the above is just what works for me and my preferences.
 

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Here's what I'm talking about. You can go off the flat bottom or top of the receiver, then a flat spot on the gas block, like the bayonet lug or the flat space right behind it. You can also use a square and catch the large flats that make up the sides of the gas block on a M70. Basically though you want to end up with two points of contact (red arrows) where you can rock the assembly back and forth to feel two crisp corners. If it's way off you'll feel 3-4 corners or just a little the corners will seem mushy. If one surface is beat up, use a different one as there are usually multiple. The last 3 pics are the mauser I'm rebarreling at the moment. The sights are soldered on and must be aligned first. The receiver bottom is flat so that is what everything is set to. The rear sight ears were beat up, but the area behind it wasn't so that was used to level the front sight.

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That's how I do it. I have an old cast iron table saw that works great for this, but any hard, flat surface (like a Formica countertop) should work in a pinch. If in doubt, check the surface with a straightedge first.

The hardest part to me is to keep the components straight as I press them on. I tap them in place with a nylon mallet first, then line up and press. No matter how hard I try, some components want to turn slightly as I press them. I usually take it out of the press to check and adjust the alignment a couple of times, but regardless of how hard I try: Some still want to turn a bit when pressing them all the way home. It would be lovely to have a horizontal press with guides to keep everything straight as you press :)
 

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Olle, Some parts do like to turn for some reason. I try to keep them on track by using gentle pressure with a open end wrench or similar to twist them back inline as you're pressing. Then level them as above. The Mauser pictured above turned out great. Originally the sight blade was noticably to the left in the front sight base on the original sewer pipe barrel. The front sight looks centered now in the base and you can actually hit what you're aiming at.
 

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It's very easy to turn the component while you're pressing it, so I use a wrench to adjust them. Sometimes it's enough to turn in by hand, so it doesn't take much. If it's off a bit, I back it up and press again while turning it with the wrench. It can be a bit tedious, but it's easier to fine tune it that way. Beating on it with a mallet works, but it's not exactly a precise method when you need that last 1/2 degree.
 
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