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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Luckily, the Civil War is still the bloodiest. Still, is there any end in sight?

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/afghan-w ... d=10849303

Editor's Notebook: Afghan War Now Country's Longest
Afghan War Now Marks Another Grim Milestone

By THOMAS NAGORSKI, ABC News Managing Editor, International
June 7, 2010

The Afghan war was enormously popular when it began on a fall Sunday eight and a half years ago. Less than a month had passed since the September 11 attacks, and President Bush could draw on deep wells of support when he ordered air strikes against Kabul , Jalalabad and the Taliban stronghold at Kandahar.


More than 50,000 Americans lost their lives in Vietnam; certainly no one expects the toll in Afghanistan to reach anything like that number.


"We are supported," Bush said that day, with only slight exaggeration, "by the collective will of the world."

By mid-November American forces had driven the Taliban from the capital; at month's end Kandahar was in the U.S. sights; in early December the Taliban leadership fled, and Marines set up a base near the Kandahar airfield.

No one proclaimed "Mission Accomplished," but they might as well have. Surely, it seemed, this would be a brief campaign.

On the one-year anniversary, in October 2002, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld told CNN, "The Taliban are gone. The Al Qaeda are gone."

And yet here we are, nearly a decade since that October Sunday, and the end of this often-tabbed "Other War" is hard to see, or fathom. Under the order of a new commander-in-chief, the U.S. is now "surging" forces into Afghanistan; a new and complex mission looms in Kandahar; and the Taliban are "surging," too – to devastating effect.

As I began this column we received word that 15 more coalition soldiers had been killed in the last two days in Afghanistan; 11 of the dead were American. Their names will be added to a grim roster whose numbers recently cleared 1,000.

And today "The Other War" has gained a fresh and dubious distinction: it is the longest war in our nation's history, surpassing the conflict in Vietnam. 103 months passed between passage of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the withdrawal of the last American combat forces from Vietnam. As of today, the Afghanistan war is 104 months old.


Afghan War Surpasses Vietnam War in Duration
In many ways, Vietnam and Afghanistan defy comparison. One was the result of a slow, creeping policy of containing communism in Southeast Asia; the other a visceral, swift response to an attack on U.S. soil.

One became a terribly divisive home-front battle, provoking passions almost as powerful as those seen a century before, during the war between the states; the other has resisted close public attention – and even today sparks far less passion, one way or the other.

More than 50,000 Americans lost their lives in Vietnam; certainly no one expects the toll in Afghanistan to reach anything like that number.

But Vietnam and Afghanistan do have this much in common: they are distant, profoundly complex, and ill-understood campaigns. Not surprisingly, then, they defy easy resolutions. And, in their own ways, these two wars have tested the mettle and patience of a nation.

For today, we remember this "other war"'s duration. 104 months ago, when those first bombs fell, anthrax was terrorizing the nation; Barack Obama was a little-known Illinois state senator; and soldiers now "surging" to Kandahar were in junior high. We didn't have YouTube, or IPhones. And we had not a single soldier in Iraq.

104 months. It's a very long time.
 

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retroangles said:
Yah this shit happens all the time in Korea...snip..... :roll:
Apparently, It does
* 17 January 1968: 31 North Korean commandos crossed the border disguised as South Korean soldiers in an attempt to assassinate President Park Chung Hee at the Blue House. The failed mission resulted in 29 commandos killed, one committed suicide, and the last captured. Two South Korean policemen and five civilians were killed by the commandos. Other reports indicated as many as 68 South Koreans killed and 66 wounded, including about 24 civilians. Three Americans were killed and another three wounded in an attempt to prevent the commandos from escaping back via the DMZ[9].
* October 1968: 130 North Korean commandos entered the Ulchin and Samcheok areas in Gangwon-do. Eventually 110 of them were killed, 7 were captured and 13 escaped.
* March 1969: Six North Korean infiltrators crossed the border near Chumunjin, Gangwon-do and killed a South Korean policeman on guard duty.
* October 1969: North Korean infiltrators killed four United States soldiers near the southern boundary of the DMZ.
* April 1970: Three North Korean infiltrators were killed and five South Korean soldiers wounded at an encounter in Kumchon, Gyeonggi-do.
* November 1974: The first of what would be a series of North Korean infiltration tunnels under the DMZ was discovered.
* March 1975: The second North Korean infiltration tunnel was discovered.
* June 1976: Three North Korean infiltrators and six South Korean soldiers were killed in the eastern sector south of the DMZ. Another six South Korean soldiers were injured.
* 18 August 1976: The Axe Murder Incident results in the death of two U.S. soldiers and injuries to another four U.S. soldiers and five South Korean soldiers. The incident may not be technically considered an "infiltration" however, as it took place in a neutral zone of the Joint Security Area.
* October 1978: The third North Korean infiltration tunnel was discovered.
* October 1979: Three North Korean agents attempting to infiltrate the eastern sector of the DMZ were intercepted, killing one of the agents.
* March 1980: Three North Korean infiltrators were killed attempting to enter the south across the estuary of the Han River.
* March 1981: Three North Korean infiltrators spotted at Kumhwa, Gangwon-do, one was killed.
* July 1981: Three North Korean infiltrators were killed in the upper stream of Imjin River.
* May 1982: Two North Korean infiltrators were spotted on the east coast, one was killed.
* March 1990: The fourth North Korean infiltration tunnel was discovered, in what may be a total of 17 tunnels in all.
* May 1992: Three North Korean infiltrators dressed in South Korean uniforms were killed at Cheorwon, Gangwon-do. Three South Koreans were also wounded.
* October 1995: Two North Korean infiltrators were intercepted at Imjin River. One was killed, the other escaped.
* April 1996: Several hundred North Korean armed troops entered the Joint Security Area and elsewhere on three occasions in violation of the Korean armistice agreement.
* May 1996: Seven North Korean soldiers crossed the DMZ but withdrew when fired upon by South Korean troops.
* April 1997: Five North Korean soldiers crossed the military demarcation line's Cheorwon sector and fired at South Korean positions.
* July 1997: Fourteen North Korean soldiers crossed the military demarcation line, causing a 23-minute exchange of heavy gunfire.
* May 26, 2006: Two North Korean soldiers entered the DMZ and crossed into South Korea. They returned after South Korean soldiers fired warning shots.
* October 7, 2006: South Korean soldiers fired warning shots after North Korean soldiers crossed briefly into their side of the border.
* October 27, 2009: A South Korean pig farmer, who was wanted for assault, cut a hole in the DMZ fence and defected to North Korea
Not the severity of OEF's insurgency, but it's not like someone flipped a switch in Korea either.
 

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This is poorly written, superficial, ill intended, mediocre article. Least the author could do is say "Thanks" to the troops that have and will protect this air bag's right to spew this manure onto the American public.

Now, if you'd like to read a serious and fact-based article on the topic, here is the link:
http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedin ... RY_ID=2193
 

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This is why we need to become energy independent (increase nuclear power) so we can say goodbye to the middle east. I'm a nuclear engineering student so maybe that slants my view...but lets get the hell off foreign energy sources. Bring our troops from the middle east home and let them know they do a great job. (If only it were that easy).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
killerofall said:
I thought we just had a seice fire with NK and that was still a technicaly a wa? I know I reade that here somewhere.

Technically, I think you're right.

It's also interesting that people are treating Afghanistan like the "war" is over, and we're now fighting the "peace."

I'm not saying anybody is wrong in doing that; it's just an interesting way of looking at it.
 

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Vietnam: November 1, 1955 - April 30, 1975, according to things online like Wiki. Though I always thought 1963-73, which is still longer then Afghanistan.
 

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IIRC, I read something years ago that Afghanistan was suppose to last
about a generation, ten more years to go. My brother will start his third war tour soon, I think that I am getting more tired of the shit then he is.
 

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Slinger646 said:
retroangles said:
Yah this shit happens all the time in Korea...snip..... :roll:
Apparently, It does
* 17 January 1968: 31 North Korean commandos crossed the border disguised as South Korean soldiers in an attempt to assassinate President Park Chung Hee at the Blue House. The failed mission resulted in 29 commandos killed, one committed suicide, and the last captured. Two South Korean policemen and five civilians were killed by the commandos. Other reports indicated as many as 68 South Koreans killed and 66 wounded, including about 24 civilians. Three Americans were killed and another three wounded in an attempt to prevent the commandos from escaping back via the DMZ[9].
* October 1968: 130 North Korean commandos entered the Ulchin and Samcheok areas in Gangwon-do. Eventually 110 of them were killed, 7 were captured and 13 escaped.
* March 1969: Six North Korean infiltrators crossed the border near Chumunjin, Gangwon-do and killed a South Korean policeman on guard duty.
* October 1969: North Korean infiltrators killed four United States soldiers near the southern boundary of the DMZ.
* April 1970: Three North Korean infiltrators were killed and five South Korean soldiers wounded at an encounter in Kumchon, Gyeonggi-do.
* November 1974: The first of what would be a series of North Korean infiltration tunnels under the DMZ was discovered.
* March 1975: The second North Korean infiltration tunnel was discovered.
* June 1976: Three North Korean infiltrators and six South Korean soldiers were killed in the eastern sector south of the DMZ. Another six South Korean soldiers were injured.
* 18 August 1976: The Axe Murder Incident results in the death of two U.S. soldiers and injuries to another four U.S. soldiers and five South Korean soldiers. The incident may not be technically considered an "infiltration" however, as it took place in a neutral zone of the Joint Security Area.
* October 1978: The third North Korean infiltration tunnel was discovered.
* October 1979: Three North Korean agents attempting to infiltrate the eastern sector of the DMZ were intercepted, killing one of the agents.
* March 1980: Three North Korean infiltrators were killed attempting to enter the south across the estuary of the Han River.
* March 1981: Three North Korean infiltrators spotted at Kumhwa, Gangwon-do, one was killed.
* July 1981: Three North Korean infiltrators were killed in the upper stream of Imjin River.
* May 1982: Two North Korean infiltrators were spotted on the east coast, one was killed.
* March 1990: The fourth North Korean infiltration tunnel was discovered, in what may be a total of 17 tunnels in all.
* May 1992: Three North Korean infiltrators dressed in South Korean uniforms were killed at Cheorwon, Gangwon-do. Three South Koreans were also wounded.
* October 1995: Two North Korean infiltrators were intercepted at Imjin River. One was killed, the other escaped.
* April 1996: Several hundred North Korean armed troops entered the Joint Security Area and elsewhere on three occasions in violation of the Korean armistice agreement.
* May 1996: Seven North Korean soldiers crossed the DMZ but withdrew when fired upon by South Korean troops.
* April 1997: Five North Korean soldiers crossed the military demarcation line's Cheorwon sector and fired at South Korean positions.
* July 1997: Fourteen North Korean soldiers crossed the military demarcation line, causing a 23-minute exchange of heavy gunfire.
* May 26, 2006: Two North Korean soldiers entered the DMZ and crossed into South Korea. They returned after South Korean soldiers fired warning shots.
* October 7, 2006: South Korean soldiers fired warning shots after North Korean soldiers crossed briefly into their side of the border.
* October 27, 2009: A South Korean pig farmer, who was wanted for assault, cut a hole in the DMZ fence and defected to North Korea
Not the severity of OEF's insurgency, but it's not like someone flipped a switch in Korea either.
My point was that the AFG war didn't end......So Korea was a bad choice...... :goof: :stonehim: :chair: :doh: :beer:
 
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