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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, finally bit on one of these and have a few questions:

It came with 3 factory batteries and the charger. The charger has a 12v and 27v setting as well as an adapter which would allow it to plug into a 110v wall outlet. Will plugging the charger/battery into a US 110v wall outlet fry the whole thing? Will it be good to go as long as it's set to 12v or 27v? I'm planning to get an adapter from Kevin in the UK In order to just use CR123 batteries and not have to mess with the factory batteries...but it would be cool to use it in 100% stock format and/or use the factory rechargeable batteries in a pinch.

Since I don't currently have a power solution I can't just "mess with it", but what's the safest way to turn on the scope with the daytime filter installed during the day or in a lighted room? I'll use a laser bore sighter to get in the ballpark at home before heading to the range during the day, but want to make sure I'm not turning up the scope too much or opening the daytime filter more than it needs to be.

The scope came with an English translation for the manual which does a great job of laying out zeroing procedures and such, but the battery recharging and daytime operation portions are either not translated properly or the above questions just aren't covered by it.

Thanks

Eric
 

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I use a 12 volt battery charger and just follow the positive and negative rules. work\s fine. dont plug it in unless you want it to fry. Its designed for dc current on russian vehicles primarily which is why the switchable voltages.Another thing is they have different ballistic cams for different weapons and calibers. Most start at at least 300 meters so remember that when you try and zero it. do not take the filter off during daylight if its on..even though its supposed to turn off it can still damage it. close the iris all the way and turn it on then slowly click by click open it to an appropriate level to see in daylight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
dvs said:
I use a 12 volt battery charger and just follow the positive and negative rules. work\s fine. dont plug it in unless you want it to fry. Its designed for dc current on russian vehicles primarily which is why the switchable voltages.Another thing is they have different ballistic cams for different weapons and calibers. Most start at at least 300 meters so remember that when you try and zero it. do not take the filter off during daylight if its on..even though its supposed to turn off it can still damage it. close the iris all the way and turn it on then slowly click by click open it to an appropriate level to see in daylight.
Thanks for the tip on how to get it safely turned on during the day; figured it was something like that but always glad to hear it from a second source.

Have a link for the 12v charger you use or did you make it yourself?

I know folks have made AA battery adapters and I'd like to get my hands on one, but I can't find one for sale anywhere and electricaly focused work isn't my thing.

Thanks

Eric
 

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here is a standard battery and a second standard battery that was no longer usable so I took out the original cells and made an adapter to fit inside and I used 2 CR2 3 volt batteries. I cut some plastic pipes to fit inside each other to make the batteries fit and lined it with some cardboard so they didnt rattle around. Then just screwed it back together. Its not recharegable but in theory you could find a similar size battery that could be rechargeable. There is a flat wrench that is used to open the battery and also is used on the scope itself to open the nitrogen filler and the dessicant pack. You might want to open your dessicant pack and make sure its blue. I open mine and dump it in a small bowl and microwave it for 20 seconds to remove the moisture if its pink. Dont leave it open more than a couple of minutes and screw the cover plate back on the scope while you are recharging the dessicant. The dessicant insert unscrews off the lid. Do not leave the battery inside the scope when its not in use.
When using the charger the battery will be positive side down. There is a Plus sign on the top of the battery and inside the charger. The two prong plug also has positive and negative markings on it.











charger: on left light is charging and on right charging is complete. They may both light up at same time when done or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks a bunch for the pics and info. I went ahead and recharged the desiccant vial in the scope and the extra in the spare parts kit.

I also tried to remove the LED to see if it needed to be changed and it was a real pain to unscrew. Ended up marring the exterior of the existing LED a little as it took a pair of pliers to get it turning. There appears to be a set screw in the LED housing, but it's ridiculously small and I couldn't find a screwdriver small enough to work it out. It seems the previous owner also had an issue since one of the extra LEDs in the spare parts kit has tool marks on it as well.

I also went ahead and purchased a 12v/2amp trickle charger and tried to charge a battery with the alligator clips connected to the positive and negative terminals but got no joy from the lights on the charger with it in "12b" mode. I'm guessing the charger is cooked and will be gong the 2 x CR123 in a sleeve method in a bit.

Thanks again for the pics and info

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Alright, got my hands on a CR2 battery adapter and the optic now powers on. Unfortunately, the reticle doesn't light up so its basically a 3x night vision monocular at the moment.

Is this just an LED being dead or not screwed in all the way? I don't have a screwdriver small enough to loosen the set screw which holds the LED in the place. Are the LEDs flush to the sight housing when screwed in to the point of working or do a few threads remained exposed? I have a few threads exposed wich would lead me to believe the LED just isn't screwed in fully. Anybody have an example of a screwdriver that's small enough to loosen the set screw? I'd rather not walk into Home Depot with the optic to test fit the screwdriver blade.

Just to make sure, the LED which illuminates the reticle should come on no matter how many 'clicks' the power switch is turned, correct?

Thanks

Eric

ETA: found a small enough screwdriver to get the set screw out, but it looks like the threads are now fucked. I'm guess ing the only way to deal with this is to try and chase the threads wih a tap to see if here salveageable. Any idea what the thread pitch for the LED housing is?

This is gonna suck if the reticle can't get lit...

Thanks

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
DVS

Would you happen to have dimensions on that adapter you made? I like that design a little better as it seems like it would allow for a more lenient interface for the terminals with the ends of the standard battery caps versus the smaller terminals on the ends of the CR2 batteries like the adapter I have now ensures.

Thanks

Eric
 

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I used some plastic pipe. I will measure it tonight and post it as best as I can. The reticle should light up after just a few clicks and then you can adjust its brightness. to chase the threads and clean out the hole to make sure no metal is inside possibly causing a short. maybe a vaccum would work as well. my led just screws down as far as it goes and I stop. I dont force it. I use a small jewelers screwdriver for the tiny screw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks in advance for the pending measurements.

The LED housing threads are really jacked up. Looks like the previous owner put an LED in with the set screw in place. The set screw jacked up the threads on the LED and those threads in turn chewed up the threads inside the optic. I'm thinking chase the threads with a tap or mave the gnarled threads milled out and have new threads cut that are of a wider diameter overall. Then have a sleeve threaded inside and out to allow the sleeve to thread into the optic and the LED to thread into the sleeve. Could also go the tritium route I guess and make a plug to hold a vial or two for lighting the reticle.
 

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ok first off. I used the body of a real 1PN58 battery that was no longer able to recharge for the outer case. the inner casing is 2 small pieces of plastic conduit pipe from the local hardware store one fitted inside the other. I used a piece of cardboard to line the inside of the battery so the plastic pipe fit snugly and wont rattle around. I also use a small pice of cardboard inside the plastic pipe where the batteries sit to keep them in line and from rattling around.

The pipe dimensions of inner pipe is roughly 1 and a half inches high. the outer pipe is 1 and 2 tenths high the outer pipe is 1 inch across the inner piece is about 8 10ths across.
you could probably get some pipe about the same outer diameter of an original battery and just build it up inside with smaller and smaller pipe fit inside it. I am working on that idea right now. I tape the two batteries together now as it seems to keep them in better contact. I also use small pieces of aluminium foil on top and bottom for extra surface contact but you can use metal strips I guess. Hope that helps.

as for the LED. clean up the hole best you can. take the screw out and clean it up. use your spare bulb and tighten it down. some slight threading on mine sticks up a little tiny bit so its not totally flush. then slowly reinsert the small screw. i had another 58 once with a similar trouble and that worked. I put a drop of clear nail polish on the screw to keep it in. Its removable with nail polish remover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
DVS

Thanks for the measurements. I saw that you used one of the factory batteries with the cells pulled out. Makes sense as the contact area for the factory end caps is much larger than the terminals at the end of an actual CR2 and should allow for more slop in the precise alignment of the batteries with the scope's battery terminals.

As far as the LED goes, I think I'm going to have to mess with the 3 LEDs I have until I can find one tha will go into the threads once I clean them up. I was able to get the set screw out before removing the LED, but the damage had been down when the previous owner took a wrench to tighten the LED down and the set screw chewed up the LED threads which then chewed up the LED housing's threads. A beer and some tinkering will likely reveal a solution.

Thaks for the measurements. I'll see what I have around the parts bin and go from there.
 
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