Chinese Military T-56 Spike Bayonet
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Thread: Chinese Military T-56 Spike Bayonet

  1. #1
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    Chinese Military T-56 Spike Bayonet

    Okay, I know I've asked a lot of questions about the front end of the Type-56 lately, but I'm moving on some stuff right now.

    This came from a dealer, unfortunately without the locking collar assembly as advertised.

    So I wanna know 2 things.

    A) Is this the proper military Type-56 AK military spike bayonet it appears to be?

    B) Can this bayonet be made to work with the commercial US-import bayonet locking collars?

    The structure seems to be the same as on the US-import versions, minus the retention peg and hole. I just want to be sure, since I suspect my chances of finding an old ChiCom military locking collar by itself is pretty low, and the newer one might be used to substitute.
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    You are on the right path. The Chinese Type 56 (AK47 and AKM) rifles use the same folding bayonet blade both military and commercial versions. Some of the ones imported the USA were made to be removable by drilling the hollow hilt and installing a small screw as a stop keeping the blade and hilt together during removal. The existing blades were unaltered except by notching the existing mounting hole creating a hook like attaching point. New blades were also made with a slightly different hook shaped attaching hole. Some new blades and hilts were made with a completely different machining on the blade and hilt for a through pin. Most all of these blades and hilts are interchangeable to some degree as the primary measurement remain the same. Note that the SKS versions do not interchange with the AK as all the dimensions are different.

    Here is a place that helps explain it all: http://akbayonets.info/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=46
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    I am interested in acquiring one of the USA imported versions with the removable Chinese Type 56 folding bayonet assemblies with the small set screw in hilt. This is the version I would like to have to complete my collection. I have several extra blades, but need the hollow hilt with the set screw. Thanks, Mr. B.

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    Just re-reading the original post. Here are the direct answers to the original questions. A. Yes B. Yes (however the holes in the hilt for the set screws or pins would be visible)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. B. View Post
    B. Yes (however the holes in the hilt for the set screws or pins would be visible)
    Ah, very good. Thank you. If I have to, I can use the more commonly available import locking collar, and maybe weld up the holes to match the rest of the military parts.
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  7. #6
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    That bayonet was made for an early milled spiker. The end is closed because it uses a screw to attach it to the front sight like an SKS. Later versions (of which there are several) are hooked at the end to allow removal from a pin that is pressed into the front sight.
    Quote Originally Posted by someone
    saying you saved a Chinese rifle by turning it into a Romanian clone is like saying you washed your hands with poop and hot water.

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    I do not agree with the above statement. The Chinese milled (AK47) and stamped (AKM) Type 56 rifles used the same folding spike bayonet. Yes, the early ones used a machine screw and the later ones used different forms of rivets for attachment, but the bayonets were the same with just the oblong mounting hole. The detachable bayonets with the hooked ends were created much later for non-military export to conform with U.S. import regulations. Some original bayonets were modified to meet these regulations. Others were made new with the hooked end. Even on the early rifles with the machine screw mount/pivots, the machine screws were staked, preventing easy removal. The FSB, (front sight base), is virtually the same between the AK and AKM with the exception that the ones using a machine screw type mount was counter sunk on one side, (right side).

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    What you just said is exactly what I just said but with more words.

    Any early spiker front sight block that uses an SKS style screw will have a corresponding closed-end bayonet and any spiker front sight block that has a pressed pin will have a corresponding open-ended bayonet. Can't have one without the other...
    Quote Originally Posted by someone
    saying you saved a Chinese rifle by turning it into a Romanian clone is like saying you washed your hands with poop and hot water.

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    I believe you miss understood all those words. ALL of the Chinese Type 56 AK & AKM folding spike bayonets were originally designed and made with the closed oblong hole for mounting. Whether for internal use or export to other countries. They were not designed or made to be easily removable. They either used the staked machine screw or were riveted to the FSB during production. Even the first semi-automatic ones imported into the US before the import rules became more restrictive. The new laws required the bayonet to be removable without tools.

    ONLY the ones made to comply with the U.S. import rules were either modified or manufactured specially to have the hooked mounting hole! There was no reason to have the bayonet removable on military rifles except the ones being imported to the USA.

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    I stand by my comments. I have owned several bring-back spike bayonets. One was from Iraq and the other was from Afghanistan. BOTH had hooked ends. And I recently bought a rusty military bayonet via eBay from South Africa that is also open ended.

    I do agree that all US imported rifles will be hooked. But there are many photos of spikers in the hands of people in 3rd world shit-holes that do not have bayonets on them but have the pressed pin still in place. How did they get their bayonets off?
    Quote Originally Posted by someone
    saying you saved a Chinese rifle by turning it into a Romanian clone is like saying you washed your hands with poop and hot water.

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    Here is my 2 cents.
    These are both commercial versions that I own. One has a long hook, and the other is short hook. I consider the long hook pre ban, and the short hook post ban.

    I have never heard of it being a requirement for US import's to have a detachable bayonet. (What about the mosin m44, or Chinese type 53 carbine?)

    My opinion on the staked screw, and the rivet pivot pin. Is that it is more of a safety issue rather than preventing purposeful removal. I dont think that they intended to stop some yokel from removing the bayonet. Rather it was a way to stop it from falling off in battle.
    To quote John Browning "anything that can happen with a gun. Will happen with a gun. "
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    **** looking for a red bakelite buttstock for the stamped IACO 56, unnumered Chinese red bakelite bayonet with brass pin, and crome belt clip.****

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregsthe1 View Post
    I stand by my comments. I have owned several bring-back spike bayonets. One was from Iraq and the other was from Afghanistan. BOTH had hooked ends. And I recently bought a rusty military bayonet via eBay from South Africa that is also open ended.

    I do agree that all US imported rifles will be hooked. But there are many photos of spikers in the hands of people in 3rd world shit-holes that do not have bayonets on them but have the pressed pin still in place. How did they get their bayonets off?
    OK …… I'll agree with you that it is possible the bring backs and pictures you mentioned may be weapons produced since the late 1990s may have the hooked, easily removed folding spikes. However the original massive quantities, (1M +) of the Type 56 both the AK47 version, (1956 - mid 60's) and the AKM version, (mid 60's to mid 70's) all had non-hooked, non-removable folding spike bayonets. These are the original military Type 56 rifles produced for their military forces and export. The hooked version of the bayonet was designed to comply with the US import regulations in the 1980's. Existing bayonet assemblies were modified and production specifications changed to comply. Once these changes had been made they may have affected rifles exported to other, "3rd world shit holes", after the US stopped AK47/AKM all importations.

    I do not agree that ALL the ones imported to US were hooked. The early imports were original military style. The import regulations were constantly being changed. The removable bayonet was required as part of the de-militarization step along with the thumbhole stocks etc.. Later the bayonets were totally banned and all mounts removed.

    I personally have handled several hundred original military issue folding spike bayonets over the years and ALL have had blades with the closed mounting hole. In Viet Nam, sometimes we cut of the barrel with a chop saw or torch to keep the bayonet assembly as a souvenir. Other times we removed the assembly from the barrel. Sometimes we cut off just the pivot assemble, removed the machine screw, punched out or ground off the rivets. The ones from Kuwait in the early 90 were done the same way. Below is an example from Kuwait 1991. Originally brought back with sawn off pivot. Later the rivet was ground off and the de-militarized blade replaced with a surplus one. I suspect this example with the rough cast exterior made have been produced in Iran.

    I currently have over 30 of the folding spike bayonets in my collection, all with minor variations. All but 2 are closed end bayonets. I consider the semi-permanently, (machine screw or rivet), attached bayonets as original military issue. The removable hooked bayonets I consider as a later commercial modification, no matter where they are found..
    IMG_0340.JPGIMG_0341.JPGIMG_0342.JPGIMG_0343.JPGIMG_0344.JPG

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AkTom's View Post
    Here is my 2 cents.
    These are both commercial versions that I own. One has a long hook, and the other is short hook. I consider the long hook pre ban, and the short hook post ban.

    I have never heard of it being a requirement for US import's to have a detachable bayonet. (What about the mosin m44, or Chinese type 53 carbine?)

    My opinion on the staked screw, and the rivet pivot pin. Is that it is more of a safety issue rather than preventing purposeful removal. I dont think that they intended to stop some yokel from removing the bayonet. Rather it was a way to stop it from falling off in battle.
    To quote John Browning "anything that can happen with a gun. Will happen with a gun. "

    The only differences in the hooked end are when they were done and why. Thousands of the commercially made semiautomatic Type 56 copies were being produced by various plants and being imported by several importers, (Polytech, Norenco, etc.). Many parts and rifles were already in the pipe line when the US regulations were changed. The existing original bayonets, ("Short" version), were modified by opening the mounting hole into a hook shape and adding a set screw or pin to the hilt to keep the assembly together when removed from the rifle. After that the blades were redesigned with the "Long" version. This version with the large through pin was more complex to produce and inherently weaker and prone to breakage and loss. The large through pin is a friction fit and held in place only by spring pressure. The elongate hole weakened the mounting point and added free play to the bayonet when extended.

    The various import restrictions that were changed several times over the years. This was in the American public's concern over "AK47s", "assault rifles", "current military weapons", etc.. The various restrictions were emplaced over the years to de-militarize and sporterize these rifles. The Chinese as well as other ComBloc countries were willing to make these modifications to be able to sell these rifles to the lucrative US market. They had the experience, machinery, equipment, surplus parts to mass produce these rifles.

    I totally agree with your final statement! These were battle rifles and the attached folding bayonet was always there when needed. Easy to extend for use and impossible to misplace or lose. The semi-permanent attachment point, (machine screw or rivet), was serviceable if replacement or repair was required. There was no need to make them easy to remove or for the hilt and blade to be held together when remove.

    After additional research I believe the change from machine screw to rivet pivots was made approximately when the change was made from AK47 to AKM style in the mid 1960s. It would make since to make this revision and simplify production during this change over. There may have been some overlap as the various arsenals used up existing parts.
    Last edited by Mr. B.; 05-16-2019 at 09:17 AM. Reason: missing word

  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by AkTom's View Post

    I have never heard of it being a requirement for US import's to have a detachable bayonet. (What about the mosin m44, or Chinese type 53 carbine?)
    Sometimes it seems like these things are decided on a whim by one person, without any real justification, and without corresponding to other decisions made elsewhere with other imported firearms.

    Remember the Norinco Model 320 Uzi clone? Almost all of them imported to the US have a deep circle machined into the rear left side of the receiver. What had been there was a badge-looking star shape with the words "POLICE MODEL" engraved inside. I'm not aware of any regulation to this effect, but this marking had to be removed in order for the gun to be imported. Did that "police" marking indicate it wasn't a "sporting purpose" gun? Seems like someone just made that call and stuck with it.

    Edit: Also, I want to thank all you guys for the very informative debate/discussion. I'm learning a lot!
    Last edited by Mr. Scratch; 05-16-2019 at 12:50 PM.

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    Has anyone else seen, own a poly, or pre poly with a non hook spike bayonet? I have never seen one. I have early poly's and pre poly's. GLNIC'S, GSAD'S and IACO'S as well as others. If someone has one please post a picture.
    The first importer regulation change I am aware of was in 89. That's excluding marking placement, and depth regulations. Of course that statement is only pertaining to a importation time period of around 1980. POLY, GSAD, GLNIC, CLAYCO, STEYER others. Not pre 68 GCA time frame, or post 89.
    **** looking for a red bakelite buttstock for the stamped IACO 56, unnumered Chinese red bakelite bayonet with brass pin, and crome belt clip.****

 

 

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