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Thread: Post Your Combat Knifes!

  1. #16
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    Sorry for the terrible pics. I made this out of a cheap Chinese M1918 Trench Knife and an M7 bayonet blade. I cut the latch assembly off the end, welded a 1/4 - 20 bolt onto the tang an finished the handle in Alumahyde. I lopped off the circular handguard to help it ride better on a belt, then stuck it in the issue sheath.

    It ain't pretty or sophisticated, but then again, it ain't intended to be...


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  2. #17
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    Older thread but here are a few more "combat" knives...and some "special" knives! Although the knives for the most part have stood the ravage of time more often then not the sheaths didn't survive. When looking at these old knives if the sheath looks like it is brand new; it probably is. I have a friend from Georgia, Sandy Morrissey, a 90+ year old WWII vet, a former Navy Enlisted Pilot who had to be cut out of the wreckage of a plane in Arkansas. The Navy Doctor suggested he work with leather for physical therapy; over the next 70 years Sandy became one of the best leather workers, making knife sheaths, holsters, and other leather goods. The new sheaths are from Sandy.

    Cattaragus Model 225Q. It was often called the Commando or Quartermaster knife; it has a large, thick blade and the butt of the handle is serrated/checkered; the intended purpose of the blade and butt was to open wooden crates that quartermaster supplies came in. They often times ended up in the combat soldier's hands; a much better, beefier knife. The grooves in the stacked leather washer handle were done intentionally during the manufacturing process.

    Camillus Mk1 USN Knife. Although my father was 4F in WWII this knife was his; I remember playing with it when I was about 9 years old; one of the bigger boys in the neighborhood tried to take it from me - my last memory of that day was the bully running home, crying I cut him. He didn't rat me out; sort of like he'd get in just as much trouble as I would have. It wasn't a large, deep cut but it did draw blood!

    I will include some of the WWII Theater Knives that I have picked up over the last few years; at the start of WWII there was (obviously) a critical shortage of material and equipments, including knives. The quality of theater knives is amazing; factory production lines were not the computerized lines of today; men used mills and other machines to make the parts being installed in the goods - in other words, there were some very skilled soldiers, sailors, marines, and coast guardsmen out there. Not all were of the highest quality;although there are some knives made that would rival some of today's custom knife makers. Without further commentary:

    handle fashioned from an Olerkin 20mm brass shell casing; the headstamp references to the Raleigh Cycle Company in England
    ​Dagger, probably from the tip portion of a Patton Saber (Model 1913 Cavalry Saber) and the plexiglas and micarta spacers probably from a wrecked aircraf

    Often times factory made knives and older bayonets with handles and blade grinding done "in theater" - in other words, near the battle front; in shipboard machine shops, aircraft repair facilities, anywhere tools were available.


    here is an older leather handled K-Bar that someone added a stag crown for the butt.

    Here's another factory knife (unknown maker - probably Marbles or Remington) using plexiglass and plastic spacers

    Even the venerable old Krag made contributions to the War Effort; this 1900 dated bayonet was cut down to knife size

    These are cut-down Kutmaster 1905 Bayonets; the chrome plated knife is more then likely modified by Kutmaster; the other done in theater. Once again this was an answer to the need for many knives (among other things) at the start of the war.

    Finally even the Canadians got into the act; this is a Ross Straight pull .303 rifle bayonet ground into a fighting knife. This knife has military unit markings that I haven't researched yet.

    That's enough for now I guess...

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  3. #18
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    please post more of your theatre knives when you get a chance! that is too cool!

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  5. #19
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    Gerber Mark II. Made 1967-1972. Not sure on the exact year.
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  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flag View Post


    Gerber Mark II. Made 1967-1972. Not sure on the exact year.
    Very cool, and very uncommon!
    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
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  7. #21
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    A few of my U.S. combat bayonets/knives.

    1) 1942 Utica Cutlery M1 (Blunt Spear-Point Bayonet). This bayonet is an M1905 shortened by Union Hoe and Fork to 10” blade length. The official designation applied to these bayonets was the M1 but collectors often refer to these as M1905E1 Bayonets but that nomenclature did not carry over to production and was only used during developmental testing. The reason collectors use the M1905E1 designation is because the Ordnance Department used the M1 terminology for new contracts for M1 bayonets manufactured between 1943-1945 as well as the revised M1905 contracts that were modified to specify the M1 bayonet (M1905 shortened to M1), which often leads to confusion for people who don’t recognize the differences between the two bayonets. When the shortened bayonet entered military inventory, it did so as a Bayonet, M1. The army made no attempt to differentiate between the M1 bayonet and the shortened M1905s. Deliveries of the modified bayonets began in September 1943 and continued until August of 1945.

    This bayonet is an early contract production that has a square fuller (or rectangular), which is fairly wide, flat on the bottom, and rises steeply on each side into the blade. The square fuller style was used on early production bayonets. The square fuller is fairly centered in the blade and there is little metal around the point. This is the primary reason that this style of shortening was abandoned and the beak point introduced. Used with the M1 Rifle and Model 1903 Series Rifles.





    2) Union Hoe and Fork (No Date) Blunt Spear-Point M1 Bayonet. This M1905 Bayonet has no marking to show what company shortened it or no date. Most collectors theorize that these were shortened before an order went out requiring contractors to mark their initials, or they were shortened before delivery. Also, approximately the time of the changeover from M1905 production to M1 production, the requirement for the date was eliminated, so many will not have a date.

    Shortly after production began, authorization was given to change the fuller shape to a round bottom style in order to simplify the tooling needed and speed production. The width and depth of this fuller varied somewhat from maker to maker and from time to time. All 6 makers changed to some version of the round fuller by late 1942. This bayonet has a narrow round fuller. The fuller is closer to the back, and this results in more metal around the point as the thicker area continues almost to the more rounded point. Used with the M1 Rifle and Model 1903 Series Rifles.




    3) M1 Sharp-Point Bayonet modified by South Korea. The blade has been cut down in width and length and reground into an M4 style configuration. The entire bayonet was then heavily parkerized.

    During and following the Korean War, large numbers of M1 rifles and bayonets were sold or given to the Republic of South Korea by the United States. Essentially the entire South Korean military was armed with the M1 rifle and carbine during the 1950s and 1960s. By the late 1960s the South Koreans began to transition to the M16 rifle series, first supplied by the U.S. and then produced under license in South Korea. The blade of these bayonets was cut to a length of about 5 Ύ inches, and the width and thickness were reduced to approximate that of the M5 blade. The back of the blade was cut to form a false edge similar to that on the M5A1. The thinning of the blade resulted in the removal of the markings, although on some specimens remnants of the marks can be seen.

    This bayonet has one remnant US marking. An ‘H’ is stamped on the top flat of the tang just in front of the lug slot It has been assumed that the ‘H’ marking found on various bayonets indicates a change in heat treatment, but that is still not certain.




    4) Imperial Knife Company (First Production – Leather Grip) M4 Bayonet. Produced in 1944-45 and used with the M1, M1A1, and M2 Carbine.




    5) Utica Cutlery Company (First Production – Modified with Rubber Grip) M4 Bayonet. Produced in late 1944-45 and used with the M1, M1A1, and M2 Carbine.



    6) Jones and Dickinson Tool Company M5A1 Bayonet. The M5 bayonet was adopted in 1953 as a replacement for the M1 bayonet.




    7) General Cutlery Company M7 Bayonet. Used with the M16 Rifle series.




    8) Colt (First Production – West Germany by Carl Eickhorn) M7 Bayonet. It is not known how many were furnished on U.S. government contracts and how many were used for foreign sales. Used with the M16, G3 and HK33 rifles.





    9) Western Bowie Knife. Western made several blade and guard markings on these. This one is the earliest one made in late 50's to about 1965 with the "Western Boulder Colo. USA" logo on one side and "Bowie" on the other side. These knifes were used in Vietnam.




    10) Camillus 1-1967 Pilot Survival Knife. These knifes were used in Vietnam.

  8. #22
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    Slayed many MRE, small tree, soccer balls, and other small acts of violence on its two tours.

  9. #23
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    No love for Khukuri's?
    here some of mine:

  10. #24
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    I posted this before, years ago. My favorite fighting knife ever. Wish I'd never sold it.

    The East Germans issued it to their Airborne force for use as a fighting knife (kampfmesser).





    It was issued in a cardboard box with knife, scabbard, and an extra length of webbing (for field repairs, perhaps?).



    The box was numbered to the knife.



    The Bakelite handle was rated against 500V of electricity.



    This is the special rain pattern uniform issued to paratroopers.



    There is a special pocket on the side of the right trouser leg designed to hold the knife. A fabric strap passes through loops on the scabbard to secure it in the pocket and a strap with a snap holds the handle.


  11. #25
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    Nice collections guys! I have one of the DDR Para knifes as well, and they sure are cool as hell. I'll post up some more pics when I get things fixed on my computer.
    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
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  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeMomma View Post
    Very cool, and very uncommon!

    Thanks. It's a great knife. It's my favorite knife that I own. Being a dagger it doesn't see much use. And being collectible, it wouldn't get much use anyway. It was my dads. I found it in a box after he died. So I can't say whether he used it in Vietnam or not. But considering the condition it's in. I doubt it saw much, if any use from him.

    The only thing that would have made it cooler is if it was one of the very first knives with the five degree cants. But since many/most of those got returned back in the day because many people thought they were defective. Those especially are hard to find and generally very expensive.

    The cats tongue material on the handle is nice.
    Last edited by Jack Flag; 11-22-2014 at 08:00 PM.

  13. #27
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    Here's another one:

    Extrema Ratio Col. Moschin



    It sees a good amount of use from me.

  14. #28
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    I don't collect knives per-se, but do have a few. I have a Lan-Cay M9 USMC marked bayonet with EDMF knuckle guard, a Phrobis first pattern sanitized CUK, Phrobis MFK with green grip/scabbard, and a Camillus USN Mk2 in the gray plastic scabbard. Two others I have are pictured. The first is a very nice USN marked, Ka-Bar made MK2 in the USN marked leather scabbard. The pommel cap is retained by screwing onto the round threaded tang (as opposed to a flat tang to which the pommel is pinned). The other is a curiosity I got at a gun show. I think it is a US M7 (but maybe Korea vintage M4?). Pommel was replaced with a brass skull clanger. Crossguard was replaced with a heavy brass one. I have not been able to identify the markings stamped on the side. Any thoughts would be welcome...
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  15. #29
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    KBar Tanto

  16. #30
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    I have a Cattagarus 225Q in VERY sad shape....this thread makes me want to hurry up and fix it.....the plexi handled knives got me thinking though, I need to replace the handle ( zero stack washers left ) ...would it be sacrilege? Hmmm....and by sad, I mean pitted/chipped blade and no handle left....saveable, bit will never be "like it should be".
    This space for rent

 

 
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