New Tigr owner with a question concerning threaded muzzle + SVD front sight
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  1. #1
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    New Tigr owner with a question concerning threaded muzzle + SVD front sight

    I recently picked up a B-West Tigr for an incredible dealer. It's barely used, original box, matching numbers, etc.. I mainly bought this rifle to have fun and own a unique piece of history. I had a chance to buy one back in 1998 at a local used shop for $700 and I kick myself for not doing it. Figured it would be surprising if they ever went down in price.

    One of the reasons it was cheaper is the previous owner threaded the muzzle to use a screw on flash hider/brake. It's only threaded in that small exposed section past the front sight post.

    I've ordered an SVD front sight assembly (front sight/flash hider combo) and was wondering if my threaded muzzle is going to be an issue with the SVD sight. Since the SVD/Tigr are both pinned in the same spot, I'm assuming no.

    I was contemplating having a threaded collar machined that I can thread over the existing cut section..of course the OD would be the same as the barrel's OD and I would make it flush as possible.
    Would that be a waste of time?

    I'm not exactly sure what the barrel is made from so I don't want that threaded section rusting out underneath the SVD sight.

    Thanks a lot. I'll post pictures soon.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the group!

    Based on what you say, I don't see any problem in just removing the TIGR sight and installing the SVD sight/flash hider. The flash hider will hide the threaded area, and you are correct in assuming that the pins should be no problem.

  3. #3
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    Here's some details about the front sight on a B-West Tigr:

    Removing/Installing front sight block on TIGR/SVD

    Thirtycal
    Kalashnikov Collectors Association

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    Thanks.
    So you don't think I need to use anything to cover the exposed metal on the threads or will the SVD sight/flash hider create a decent seal to keep water/moisture out? If not I'll just coat the exposed threads with grease before installing the new sight...if that will be enough (or possibly wrap the threads real well with plumbers tape but not sure if that would melt).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regulatori View Post
    Thanks.
    So you don't think I need to use anything to cover the exposed metal on the threads or will the SVD sight/flash hider create a decent seal to keep water/moisture out? If not I'll just coat the exposed threads with grease before installing the new sight...if that will be enough (or possibly wrap the threads real well with plumbers tape but not sure if that would melt).
    If the metal is bare, then you could plug the muzzle with a foam ear plug, and give the tip of the barrel a quick hit with some black appliance paint. Two or three LIGHT coats should do it. Make sure you clean the area well with a lint-free cloth path soaked in rubbing alchohol. You can see in the photos in that thread how much of the barrel will be covered with the new front sight block, so that should be your guide about how far to paint. You won't want to have any of the painted area exposed since the paint won't be a perfect match for the original - so you'll want to 'hide' your paint work with the new front sight block.

    Get semi-gloss or flat black. If you really want the paint to stick well, heat the barrel with a hairdryer to a point where it's uncomfortable to keep your finger on the metal. When it's hot, spray a light coat and let it dry about 20 minutes. Then heat it again and put another coat on and let that dry. Repeat again if necessary and let it dry overnite.

    Let me emphasize LIGHT coats here. You don't want to put a bunch of paint on the barrel since that will make it difficult to press the new sight block on. It would be best to only paint only the bare metal, so you'll want to mask off the rest of the barrel I would assume.

    -Thirtycal
    Kalashnikov Collectors Association

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    I had another question but didn't want to start another thread...before I know it the first page will be filled with my questions.


    I purchased an SVD flash hider and it's not pre-drilled, there is only two dimples to start the hole.

    If you did this yourself, do you have any advice?


    I was going to first mount the SVD flash hider in the correct position and then mark the barrel (with tape) where the flash hider ends. Then I'll remove the flash hider and measure back from the line to see how close the dimples match up. If they do, then I drill.

    Does the require a press or is a handheld drill okay? I was thinking of putting the flash hider in a vise (with padding) and using a handheld drill with a black HSS drill bit...should I spend extra and just get a titanium bit? It's only going to be used for this project. Should I do a pilot hole first?

    I just don't want to screw it up but figure I'm way over thinking it.

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    Nope you're not overthinking it.

    But I'd offer this advice nonetheless: Take it to a gunsmith.

    It's not a hard job, but you need the right equipment. A drill press is a must. Cobalt drill bits are a must. Calipers are a must. Gunsmiths have this stuff and know tricks you don't know.

    If you have to do it yourself, with nothing but a hand drill, then I'd probably use the old front sight as a drill guide by clamping the two sites together (side-by-side) and drilling thru the holes in the old sight and into the new sight... But before that I'd put boning rods on the two cuts in the barrel to ensure they are parallel and level to each other, and also to make sure that the cuts are orthogonal to the rifle barrel. If they are cut nicely (which they sometimes aren't), then you should be able to use the clamp trick / drill guide trick I mentioned. It doesn't have to be perfect, but you need to know the difference between good enough and not good enough - and that's hard to explain. Keep in mind that the pins are a friction fit, so they need to be pressed in with a bit of force or they will walk out with every shot fired and eventually will be gone.

    BTW, here's the basic concept of boning rods, written by my good buddy Jethro:

    Simple way to align barrel for reinstallation

    And also BTW no you don't need to pilot drill them, but you would be smart to use a starter punch to ensure the drill bit centers and doesn't walk - you'd do this using the same 'old sight as a drill guide' trick I mentioend earlier, with the properly sized transfer punch.

    These are transfer punches:

    http://www.harborfreight.com/hand-to...-set-3577.html

    I'm trying to give you 10 years of hard learned lessons in one simple reply ;-). That number of years ago, I knew nothing about machining. Now I know a little. Always trying to learn more.

    -Thirtycal
    Last edited by thirtycal; 01-20-2017 at 11:45 PM.
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  9. #8
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    carbon buildup will fill the threads up under hider. I see your concern about rust if using corrosive ammo. maybe fill the threads with epoxy or something prior to hider installation. hiders fit these tigrs loose but the pins tighten em right up. off center slightly but not an issue in use. not really noticeable either. biggest thing is cleaning the muzzle crown under hider and checking for rust or pits in a followup cleaning 1 to 2 weeks later. ultra sonic cleaner might help but ive not used one on svd yet. ultrasonic might hurt paint and touchups on hiders pins.
    DISCLAIMER; I live in a murderous world imploding over other folks secret agendas. in doing so im told to pretend to act ''normal'' like everyone else and hide under a rock and make normal sheep noises. kinda like a sheep watching its family being led into an automated meat grinder. think about the other sheep saying don't draw attention to yourself they might target you next. F*#K THAT! stand up and make a last stand for humanity! Robbie f*#king parker were live! WAKE THE F*#K UP!!!!

 

 

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